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I'm just making my first attempts with awk and have one, maybe, simple question. I am trying to list a directory and extract some information from the listing based on a string. The bash script I'm trying is:

 ls *.hdf > temporary.list
 nom2=`awk 'BEGIN {FS = "." } ; { $1 ~ /'$year$month'/ } { print $2 }' temporary.list `
 file=$year$month.$nom2.hdf 
 file2=$year$month.hdf

where year and month change in a for loop (1981 to 1985 and 01 to 12). The temporary.list file is composed of 12 lines like:

198201.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198202.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198203.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198204.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198205.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198206.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198207.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198208.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198209.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198210.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198211.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf
198212.s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf

I want to select files depending on year-month. The problem is that my awk sentence does not seem to get different lines as different registers, I suppose. The output of the script is:

nom2 = h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h
s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst
s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst
s04m1pfv51-bsst 

file = 198201.h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h
s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst h s04m1pfv51-bsst
h s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst
s04m1pfv51-bsst s04m1pfv51-bsst.hdf 

file2= 198201.hdf

Maybe is some simple syntax error, any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

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1  
What's the output that you WANT to get from your script? –  ghoti Sep 11 '12 at 11:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to give awk the variables you need it to know about.
To pass a variable to awk, use -v for each one.

awk -v y="$year" -v m="$month" 'BEGIN { FS = "." } $1 == y m { print $2 }' file

awk vars can then be used directly, no $ needed.
as with print the space between them will be ignored, a real space would have to be quoted. So the way it is now, it checks if the first field ($1) exactly matches (==) 'y m' which is expanded to '${year}${month}'. If the match happens then the 2nd field ($2) is printed.


keep in mind that awk logic blocks are in the form

condition { action [; action ..] }

note no curly braces around condition
you also don't need ; between blocks, only between actions, but they don't hurt either.
so, { $1 ~ /'$year$month'/ } will do nothing the way it is written.


having said all that, I would go with pure Bash for what you're doing:

while IFS='.' read -r ym f e
do 
    printf '%8s: %s\n' "year"  "${ym%??}"   \
                       "month" "${ym#????}" \
                       "file"  "$f"         \
                       "ext"   "$e"
done < file
share|improve this answer
    
The { $1 ~ /'$year$month'/ } does do something. The first single quote ends a single quoted string so that the $year$month substitution works... –  Jens Sep 11 '12 at 11:34
    
Pasing variables is ok in my script, I just showed the awk part. The point is that nom2 should show only one value, coresponding to the year and month and what I get is nom2 s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b s04m1pfv50-bsst-16b showing the 12 months value –  pacomet Sep 11 '12 at 11:35
    
If I add grep $year$month to the directory listing (temporary.list is then a single line file) then it works and properly extracts the values I need. But I think this should be done with awk. –  pacomet Sep 11 '12 at 11:38
1  
@jens right, and that is the way not to pass vars to awk –  c00kiemon5ter Sep 11 '12 at 11:39
    
@pacomet right, because the condition acts like an empty if statement and print $2 prints unconditionally. I told you on my answer: { $1 ~ /'$year$month'/ } is like if ($1 ~ /'$year$month'/) /*empty*/; –  c00kiemon5ter Sep 11 '12 at 11:40

It's a bad habit to parse lists of files the way you're doing it in your bash script, since it's incompatible with a number of special characters that might appear in a filename. Like rules of grammar, you should break the rules only if you know them well. :) A for loop is a better construct for handling files:

#!/bin/bash

year=1982
month=9

for filename in $(printf "%04d%02d" "$year" "$month").*.hdf; do
  nom2=${filename#*.}
  nom2=${nom2%.*}
  file2=${filename%%.*}.hdf
  printf "file=%s\nnom2=%s\nfile2=%s\n\n" "$filename" "$nom2" "$file2"
done

Is that what you're looking for? Note that parameter expansion using % and # works in traditional bourne shell as well as bash, so it's extremely portable.

If you REALLY want to use awk, you've still got lots of options.

#!/bin/bash

year=1982
month=9

for filename in $(printf "%04d%02d" "$year" "$month").*.hdf; do
  nom2=$(awk -vym="^$year$month." -vf="$filename" 'BEGIN{if(f~ym){sub(/\..*/,"",f);print f}}')
  file="$nom2.hdf"
  printf "file=%s\nnom2=%s\nfile2=%s\n\n" "$filename" "$nom2" "$file2"
done

Note that using printf to format the date allows you to handle single-digit months with a leading zero, with minimal effort.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't figure out how sub works here. It also warns of an error in the double quote /,",f close to sub. –  pacomet Sep 11 '12 at 14:14
    
Wups, typo (now fixed) - I missed a quote in sub(). The idea is that it looks for a pattern starting with the first dot and going to the end of the line, replaces it all with an empty string. And the workspace it's doing this in is the "f" variable, set with -v earlier. –  ghoti Sep 11 '12 at 14:16
    
Thanks for your help –  pacomet Sep 11 '12 at 14:22

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