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In getFieldSignExtended(int,int,int), I have if-else statements inside if-else statements. I have int result as a global variable of this function. Depending on where program control flows, I want this function to return result2.

At first I had one return statement at the bottom of this function, that didn't work and I found out that scope in C is not like in Java. Thus I return 1; at the bottom of the function, and I have 8 return result2 statements in the if-else blocks.

Is there a better way to organize this function? I don't want to nest if-else blocks and I want as few return statements as possible.

This is homework, but it was already graded and I'm just correcting a few errors that came up.

getFieldSignExtended(int,int,int) gets a bitfield from value from hi to lo inclusive (hi and lo can be == to eachother, etc.) and sign extends it (based on testing the sign bit). All of this code deals with 2's complement.

If you find any other big C convention mistakes, I'll be glad to correct them.

Thanks in advance.

int getFieldSignExtended (int value, int hi, int lo) {
    unsigned int result = 0;
    int result2 = 0;
    unsigned int mask1 = 0xffffffff;
    int numberOfOnes = 0;

    if((hi == 31) && (lo == 0)) {
            result2 = value;
            return result2;
    }

    if((lo == 31) && (hi == 0)) {
            result2 = value;
            return result2;
    }
    else if(hi < lo) {
        // Compute size of mask (number of ones).
        numberOfOnes = lo-hi+1;
        mask1 = mask1 << (32-numberOfOnes);
        mask1 = mask1 >> (32-numberOfOnes);
        mask1 = mask1 << hi;
        result = value & mask1;
        result = result >> hi;
        if(result & (0x1 << (numberOfOnes-1))){
            // if negative
            int maskMinus = (0x1 << numberOfOnes);
            maskMinus = maskMinus -1;
            maskMinus = ~maskMinus;     
            result2 = maskMinus | result;
        }
    } else if(lo < hi) {
        // The number of ones are at the 'far right' side of a 32 bit number.
        numberOfOnes = hi-lo+1;
        mask1 = mask1 >> (32-numberOfOnes);
        mask1 = mask1 << lo;
        result = value & mask1;
        result = result >> lo;
        if(result & (0x1 << (numberOfOnes-1))){
            //if negative
            int maskMinus = (0x1 << numberOfOnes);
            maskMinus = maskMinus -1;
            maskMinus = ~maskMinus;     
            result2 = maskMinus | result;
            return result2;
        }
    }else{
        // hi == lo
        unsigned int mask2 = 0x1;

        // Move mask2 left.
        mask2 = mask2 << hi;
        result = mask2 & value;
        result = result >> hi;
        if(result == 0x1){
            result2 = 0xffffffff;
            return result2;
        }
        else{
            result2 = 0x0;
            return result2;
        }   
    }   

    return 1;
}
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2  
the concept of one return statement per function can be traced back to the concepts of structured programming. The concept is about having one exit to a routine. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structured_programming –  jsobo Sep 11 '12 at 12:07
2  
Folks still debate this topic. Personally I tend to think it is less relevant today. See: msmvps.com/blogs/peterritchie/archive/2008/03/07/… –  jsobo Sep 11 '12 at 12:09
3  
Oh my god, your functions are so long ! Cut them down to smaller functional parts. Also you made a typo at the begining using ; instead of {. –  Eregrith Sep 11 '12 at 12:11
1  
@jsobo: I've read the article through, but still don't any benefit in having just one return per function. I wonder what was the reasoning behind that principle in the old days? –  Vlad Sep 11 '12 at 12:12
1  
It's remarkable how many people are willing to review such code! Why don't you only post the getFieldSignExtended function, and at least remove all the debugging printf cruft? Did you even take a good look at the code yourself? The expression ((lo == 31) && (hi == 0)) is tested twice with exactly the same statements in the if-clause. The numberOfOnes variable is initialized to exactly the same value at different locations in the function. These are only a few examples of things you could have fixed easily, and let other users focus on your real problem instead of having to clean up first –  Bart Sep 11 '12 at 12:26
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7 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

sorry too much reading, and i didn't do anything in c for ages, but you can create small function which swap lo and hi, and set hi as bigger value and lo as lower, then you will not need so many block which are basically doing same thing

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I ended out not swapping hi and lo exactly as you advised, but calling a getFieldSignExtended() again, recursively with hi and lo switched. Everything works fine now. –  Clara Sep 16 '12 at 1:55
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The result and result2 are not "global variables of the function", they are local variables. The problem is not in that "scope in C is not like in Java", but that some of the branches in your function fail to assign result2. Specifically, there is no assignment in the branch that does

printf(" result2 %08x \n",result2);

If you declare a variable without a value in Java, the compiler look for code paths that uses this variable before an assignment, and alerts you if there is one; in C you have to watch for these situations yourself.

If you put return result2 at the bottom, and make sure that all code paths assign result2 the right value, your code will work with a single return statement, just like your setField does.

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1  
Any decent C compiler also gives you a warning if you may use a variable that is uninitialized. –  Shahbaz Sep 11 '12 at 12:13
    
@Shahbaz That's true, but in Java it is an error, not a warning. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 11 '12 at 12:18
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You don't need the multiple return statements, not as your function works at the moment. Just initialize result2 to 1 and do return result2; at the end of the function.

Or instead of assigning to result2 and then directly returning, why not just do e.g. return value; or return maskMinus | result; etc.

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The general answer is to set aside a variable to store your return value (e.g., ret_val) and assign your return value to it in places where you are currently returning a value. You may have to adjust your control flow also since now you are not exiting your function with a value at those places.

Then, at the "bottom" of your function you can return once with the value of ret_val. I.e.,

 return ret_val;

once should be sufficient with the changes above.

Looking over your algorithm and rearranging your code, perhaps delegating some of the work to functions might be another approach to help simplify/clarify your code eliminating the need for multiple (or excessive, your judgment call) returns.

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You can use goto statement and at single point you can return result2 value. if nicely explained here

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Of course goto statements are typically frowned upon, especially in academic uses. –  Mike Sep 11 '12 at 12:19
    
goto is a big no-no ! –  Eregrith Sep 11 '12 at 12:34
    
@Eregrith It's not an unconditional "no-no", but in the context of a homework it certainly is: I am yet to meet a professor who would see eight gotos in his student's homework, and say nothing :) –  dasblinkenlight Sep 11 '12 at 12:43
    
Well IMHO if professors forbid them, there's got to be a reason. Personally I find them horrible for code reading because the flow is not really readable, but yeah programatically speaking there is "nothing wrong" with them. –  Eregrith Sep 11 '12 at 13:13
    
In C, goto is used all the time for error handling. It is the only sane way. goto is a dangerous tool, agreed, but it is also very useful. A chainsaw is also dangerous (and no professor lets his students use chainsaws on "basics of mechanics" course), but that doesn't mean no one ever anywhere should use it. –  Shahbaz Sep 11 '12 at 14:15
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Just looking at the getFieldSignExtended function, the problem as I see it is pretty simple. You only have 2 places where it can return right now... lets simplify it a little to show you what I mean:

if (A)
  do something
if (B)
  do the same thing
else if (C)
  do something else
else if (D)
  do something else
else
  do something else 

So all you really need to do is combine A & B, by doing that there's only a single flow in your function, it can't go down an "if" and an "else if", only one of them. So if you do this:

if(((hi == 31) && (lo == 0)) || ((lo == 31) && (hi == 0))){
    result2 = value;
}else if(hi < lo){  
...
// the rest as is

Then every where you return result2; just delete that line, and at the end instead of return 1; just return result2;

Now you just have a single return statement for this function.

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Try this :

int getFieldSignExtended (int value, int hi, int lo) {
  if (hi < lo) {
    // the field is on the 'far right'
    hi = lo - hi;
    lo = 0;
  }

  return (value << (31 - hi)) >> (31 - hi + lo);
}

Note that your convention of giving a special meaning to the case 'hi < lo' is of dubious value. It makes probably more sense to return zero in this case.

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Note that I used the common convention of numbering bits from right to left. –  Antoine Mathys Sep 11 '12 at 13:25
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