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I am trying to replace two lines in a file with one new line:

foo1.txt
  aaa   aaa
  bbb   bbb
  ccc   ccc
  ddd   ddd
  bbb   bbb
  ddd   ddd

after the replace the file should look like this

foo1.txt
  aaa   aaa
  eee   eee
  ddd   ddd
  bbb   bbb
  ddd   ddd

Is there a way with sed or some other command make this replace in all files of a folder

I have been trying with sed but without any success: sed 's/bbb\tbbb\nccc\tccc/eee\teee/g' foo*.txt

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Do you want to replace a line with text ( of any string ) in all files in a folder with new line –  aravind.udayashankara Sep 11 '12 at 12:32
    
Maybe this helps: sed and Multi-Line Search and Replace –  Reinier Torenbeek Sep 11 '12 at 12:34
    
I want to replace two lines with text ( with some special characters like tabs, dollar signs ) in all files in a folder with one new line –  sdmythos_gr Sep 11 '12 at 12:34
    
Updated the example file. The first line can be a lot of times in the files but it should be replaced only when the second line matches as well. –  sdmythos_gr Sep 11 '12 at 13:25
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Even if this question should be already answered in this thread, I didn't manage to make the "one-line-one-command" solution work.

This command:

perl -pe 's/START.*STOP/replace_string/g' file_to_change

seems not to work for me and doesn't perform a multi-line replace. I had to split it in two different perl scripts, like this:

perl -pe 's/bbb\tbbb\n.*/placeholderstring/g' foo1.txt | perl -pe 's/placeholderstring  ccc\tccc/eee\teee/g'

Try to see what works best for you.

EDIT:

With the new sample text, the only solution that works is the one by William Pursell

sed '/bbb\tbbb/{ N; s/.*ccc\tccc/  eee\teee/; }' foo1.txt
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The second option does the trick, but I am left with some placeholderstring in the file... meaning that there are some lines that only match the first line and not the second... Will edit the example... –  sdmythos_gr Sep 11 '12 at 13:22
    
Maybe these two perl regexp are easier to remind, but I think that the solution provided by @William Pursell is the best one for what you are trying to do. –  Avio Sep 11 '12 at 13:26
1  
I am accepting your answer because the sed example as William described it was not so clear for me... In your answer I find it very clear and easy to adapt for my files! Thanks!! –  sdmythos_gr Sep 11 '12 at 13:40
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There are a lot of ways to interpret your question. If you are trying to replace lines at a fixed position, eg lines 2 and 3, do:

sed '2d; 3s/.*/newtext/'

If you want to replace a matching line and the line following:

sed '/pattern/{ N; s/.*/newtext/; }'

To replace the two consecutive lines in which the second line matches a pattern:

sed -n '$p; N; /pattern/d; P; D'
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For the first, lines are not in a fixed position. For the second, it would be better if I could replace the line matching and the previous, not the following... –  sdmythos_gr Sep 11 '12 at 12:44
    
+1! thank you for your answer –  sdmythos_gr Sep 11 '12 at 13:43
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nawk '{if($0~/bbb.*bbb/){getline;getline;print "newline"};print}' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
aaa   aaa
bbb   bbb
ccc   ccc
ddd   ddd
> nawk '{if($0~/bbb.*bbb/){getline;getline;print "newline"};print}' temp
aaa   aaa
newline
ddd   ddd
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