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I have been reading about the template system in the D language and came upon a unusual construct, static if.

From what I managed to grasp it is evaluated at compile time, but from what I have searched, the example shown here did not quite enlighten me.

template Factorial(ulong n)
{
    static if(n < 2)
        const Factorial = 1;
    else
        const Factorial = n * Factorial!(n - 1);
}

What does static if do, and when should I use it?

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didn't get what actually you are expecting , Please elaborate the problem – aravind.udayashankara Sep 11 '12 at 12:43
3  
How is this even tagged C++? – R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 11 '12 at 12:46
    
@R. Martinho Fernandes From what I know this is intended as a superseed of C++ – coredump Sep 11 '12 at 12:47
1  
@coredump if you mean "superset", then no. D is nowhere near a superset of C++. – R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 11 '12 at 12:55
2  
Whereas if @coredump means "supersede", then we can all only dream of the day... – shambulator Sep 12 '12 at 9:53
up vote 10 down vote accepted

the D static if is the base for "conditional compilation", and plays an important role wherever a compile time decision about a variant of a code must be taken.

Since D doesn't have a preprocessor, things like

#ifdef xxx
compile_this_piece_of_code
#endif

can become

static if(xxx)
{
     compile_this_pece_of_code
}

similarly, metaprogramming can happen also via static if:

template<int x>
struct traits
{ some definition calculated from x };

template<>
struct traits<0>
{ same definitions for the 0 particular case }

can be

template(int x)
{
    static if(x==0)
    { some definitions }
    else
    { some other same definitions }
    even more definition common in the two cases
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I think what confused me was the function like usage . – coredump Sep 11 '12 at 12:59
    
Btw. First example will not compile. For that D has the version(XXX) {} else {} – DejanLekic Sep 11 '12 at 13:14
1  
It depends on what xxx actually is: if it is a symbol, version is the statement, if it is a constant expression static_if works. The right example is most likely not #ifdef... but #if .... – Emilio Garavaglia Sep 11 '12 at 19:01
    
So why don't you change it in your answer? – HelloGoodbye Nov 6 '15 at 12:43

Andrei Alexandrescu has a good talk that you can watch here about static if in a C++ context (if that's what your asking for).

Link: http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/GoingNative/GoingNative-2012/Static-If-I-Had-a-Hammer

Short answer- it makes the syntax for some template metaprogramming a lot more intuitive.

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Walter also touched static if in one of his presentations, I just forgot which one... :) – DejanLekic Sep 11 '12 at 16:56

The wikipedia example is actually pretty simple:

template Factorial(ulong n)
{
    static if(n < 2)
        const Factorial = 1;
    else
        const Factorial = n * Factorial!(n - 1);
}

It is an eponymous template (See Jonathan's comment below). n is the template parameter. So, what if you instead wrote:

template Factorial(ulong n)
{
    if(n < 2) // NOTE: no static here
        const Factorial = 1;
    else
        const Factorial = n * Factorial!(n - 1);
}

? - It will not work. Check http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/3fe074f2 . The reason is the fact that static if and "normal" if have different semantics. static if takes an assignment expression ( http://dlang.org/version.html , section "Static If") that is evaluated at compile time, while normal if takes an expression that is evaluated at run-time.

Static if is just one way to do the "conditional compilation" mentioned by Emilio. D also has the version keyword. So Emilio's first conditional compilation example (which does not work in D) becomes something like:

version (XXX) { 
    // XXX defined 
} else { 
    // XXX not defined 
}

If you want to use static if for this, you would write something like:

enum int XXX = 10;
static if (XXX == 10) {
    pragma(msg, "ten");
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Factorial's not a template function. It's an eponymous template. Uses of the template are replaced with the result of the template which is the symbol inside the template with the same name as the template - e.g. Factorial!5 becomes 120. It's entirely a compile time construct. This is completely different from a templated function which is called like any other function but is instantiated with differently depending on the types of its arguments. Based on your answer, I'm guessing that you understand it and just have the terminology wrong, but you're going to cause confusion as it is. – Jonathan M Davis Sep 11 '12 at 15:52
    
Correct. :) I am going to update my answer so the terminology is right. – DejanLekic Sep 11 '12 at 16:49

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