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I have built a website (A) which logs in to and retrieves customer data from a separate web service.

The organisation that owns (A) also has a website (B) which has a web form. They want a logged in customer on (A) to be able to click across to (B) and see a pre-populated form with their details.

This means (A) must write their customer ID to a cookie, which (B) can read, and then (B) can request the data from the web service, and pre-populate the form.

This raises two questions:

  1. Can website (B) read the cookie for website (A)?

  2. If so, to prevent someone from editing a cookie and seeing other people's data in the form, I would need to do something like encrypt the cookie on (A) and then have that decrypted in (B) - any suggestions along this line?

I can't change the existing login to OAuth or something, as the web service is consumed by several other sites, so this cannot change.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No. Website B can't read a cookie from website A.

The easiest work-around is to pass login/credential information from website A to website B and have website B set a seperate cookie. For example, after logging into website A you could have them quickly redirected to website B with an encrypted querystring. Website B could then read the information, set its own cookie, and redirect the user back to site A.

It's messy but possible.

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Thanks Chris. The problem is, there's no "user action" that indicates they want to move from A to B. They login to A, do some activity, then they might navigate to B at some point, not via a link on site A though. It might be possible to have the two sites on the same domain, as subdomains. Would that make it an possibility? –  Sean Sep 11 '12 at 13:17
    
If after the login you can redirect the user quickly to website B, set the cookie there, and then redirect them back, they could visit website B at any time in the future (while the cookie persisted) and have that information available. –  Chris Van Opstal Sep 11 '12 at 13:18
    
Sorry, I didn't see the double-redirect on first read. This gives me an option, thanks. –  Sean Sep 11 '12 at 13:22

You mentioned the same company owns both sites. As you suspected, if the sites have the same domain like www.mycompany.com and store.mycompany.com, then they can share cookies. The HTTP response header would look something like this:

Set-Cookie: user_id=1295214458; Path=/; Domain=.mycompany.com

Since the client has direct access to this data, you should also include a signature so tampering would be detected. Usually the whole thing is encrypted and signed into a "token", and that is set as the cookie. But technically, just the signature is required.

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There are open source tools on the internet that can do that, but this s against the whole idea behind the cookies philosophy. Cookies are meant to be accessed by only one domain. You can however mock that domain and 'Hack' into the browser. It's not recommended and some browsers have tighter security and don't allow that.

I suggest you create a web service in website A and give reading access to B to read it.

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Cookies are only accessible to a single domain that they are set to.

I believe if you are using two sub-domains on the same domain it would be possible to share the cookies, however the browser doesn't send cookies set on one domain to any others.

Edit: You also want to avoid storing large amounts of data in a cookie. Is there perhaps the chance you could create an api that site B could query with javascript?

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If in your case all your users use browsers with HTML5 support you can use window.postMessage method that allows to addEventListener on one side and to postMessage from the other. Here is a nice article/example: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/window.postMessage.

Then the steps are simple:

  1. add to site A a hidden iframe to site B
  2. send B's cookie to A using window.postMessage
  3. store the received cookie in A's cookie
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