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Suppose I have such a struct:

struct Foo
{
  const int bar;
  const char baz;

  Foo& operator=(const Foo& other)
  {
    memcpy(this,&other,sizeof(Foo)); //How am I supposed to write this decently?
    return *this;
  }
}

I want all fields of Foo to be final, and I want the variables of type Foo to behave just like other primitive value types. Say, int, surely we can write stuff like this:

 int i = 0;
 i = 42;

 Foo foo = {007,'B'}
 foo = {42,'X'}

Yet for my poor Foo type, do I have to resort to means like memcpy to work around the type safety check? I know I could drop the const modifiers, mark the fields private and add some getters, but that's not the point. I just wanna know if there is a decent way to write the content of the = operator.

Thanks in advance!

~~~~~

Check out the following examples:

//If the = op is not implemented, this won't compile
Foo stat;
for(int i=0;i!=100;++i)
{
  stat = func(i);
  if(stat.bar == 0)...
}

//But weird thing is, if I declare the 'stat' inside the for block, it works just fine with gcc
for(int i=0;i!=100;++i)
{
  Foo stat = func(i); 
  //printf("%p\n",&stat); => same variable same address!!
  if(stat.bar == 0)...
}

Does that make any sense to you?

share|improve this question
2  
This makes no sense (and that's why you can't make it work). You want const an "all-const" type that is mutable? Make up your mind. And no, not even memcpy can do that. The end result is undefined behaviour. Get ready to see the compiler doing things you didn't ask it to. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 11 '12 at 13:17
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes - Why couldn't I use memcpy? If it has a definite size and a definite address, why couldn't I write stuff into the mem chuck occupied by it? –  Need4Steed Sep 11 '12 at 14:24
    
Isn't it obvious? Because the members are const! –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 11 '12 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There's no pretty way, and I agree with other answers that you should reconsider the design.

But if you still think it's the least evil for your problem, a couple more options:

Foo& operator=(const Foo& other)
{
    const_cast<int&>(bar) = other.bar;
    const_cast<char&>(baz) = other.baz;
    return *this;
}

Or

#include <memory>

// Foo must never be used as a base class!
// If your compiler supports the c++11 final feature:
struct Foo final
{ /*...*/ };

Foo& operator=(const Foo& other)
{
    if (this != &other) {
        this->~Foo();
        new(this) Foo(other);
    }
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The second one leads to undefined behavior if the actual object has a type that is derived from Foo. Don't ever do this! It was a serious mistake for the standard to include this code in its discussion of object lifetime, because it gives people the impression that this is something that's actually useful. –  Pete Becker Sep 11 '12 at 13:24
    
@PeteBecker: Good point. Added comment. –  aschepler Sep 11 '12 at 13:30
    
@aschepler The second solution looks very cool, no cast, no manual memory manipulation, I just like it. Thanks a lot ;) –  Need4Steed Sep 11 '12 at 14:04
2  
The first one leads to undefined behaviour in all cases. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 11 '12 at 14:26
1  
The second also leads to undefined behaviour if the constructor throws. Both options are dangerous. If you need to modify something, don't declare it const in the first place. –  Mike Seymour Sep 11 '12 at 17:11

In C++, copy assignment simply makes no sense for an all-const type. Don’t implement it.

Do use all-const types where it makes sense but be aware that this type will not behave like int because int in C++ simply isn’t const unless you declare it so.

share|improve this answer
1  
Or make the object at the use-site const. –  Xeo Sep 11 '12 at 13:15
    
@Xeo Yes – but only if it makes sense to have either const or non-const objects in the first place. It’s entirely conceivable that objects of a given type never change. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 11 '12 at 13:19

The decent way to write it in this case is:

Chunk& operator=(const Foo& other) = delete;

(or as private pre-C++11)

If all your members are const, why on earth would you want to change them?

share|improve this answer
    
Decent perhaps, but unnecessary. It's implicitly deleted by the presence of const members. –  Mike Seymour Sep 11 '12 at 14:02

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