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Lots of threads about iterating over an array of hashes, which I do daily. However now I want to iterate over an AoH in and AoH. I'm interested in the array "chapters" because I want to add a hash to each array element of that inner array:

$criteria = [
    {
      'title' => 'Focus on Learning',
      'chapters' => [
                          {
                            'content_id' => '182',
                            'criteria_id' => '1',
                            'title' => 'Focus on Learning',
                          },
                          {
                            'content_id' => '185',
                            'criteria_id' => '1',
                            'title' => 'Teachers Role',
                          },
                          {
                            'content_id' => '184',
                            'criteria_id' => '1',
                            'title' => 'Parents in Class',
                          },
                          {
                            'content_id' => '183',
                            'criteria_id' => '1',
                            'title' => 'Students at Home',
                          }
                        ],
      'tot_chaps' => '4'
    },

This, in theory, is want I want to do.

for my $i ( 0 .. $#$criteria ) {
   for my $j ( 0 .. $#$criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}) {
      print $criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}->[$j]{'title'}."\n";
   }
}

print $criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}->[1]{'title'}."\n"; -> Teachers Role
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to add something, just do it. I'm not sure I understood where you want to add what exactly. If you want another key/value pair for each of the chapters, do it like this:

for my $i ( 0 .. $#$criteria ) {
  for my $j ( 0 .. $#{$criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}}) {
    $criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}->[$j]->{'Teachers Role'} = 'Stuff';
  }
}

Also, there was a little bug in the code: use $#{$criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}} instead of $#$criteria->[$i]{'chapters'} because the $# part only works until the first ->, so it tries to access ->[$i]{'chapters'} out of the value of $#$criteria which is a number and doesn't work.

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Thanks for the "value added" answer on how to add the hash. –  breadwild Sep 11 '12 at 14:36
    
I'm glad you like it. I wasn't really sure what your question was and it seemed the explanations the others offered weren't really the thing you were looking for. –  simbabque Sep 11 '12 at 15:16
    
oops, I noticed that while the "add" part worked, it wasn't until I applied the {}'s pointed out by ruakh –  breadwild Sep 11 '12 at 16:13
    
That was in my answer as well, below the line. ;-) –  simbabque Sep 12 '12 at 7:08
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use warnings;
use strict;

foreach my $criterion (@$criteria) {
  foreach my $chapter (@{$criterion->{chapters}}) {
    print $chapter->{title}, "\n";
  }
}
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This worked as well as ruakh's –  breadwild Sep 11 '12 at 16:14
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I agree with perreal, but to answer your question a bit more narrowly — your code should be fine, except that, to use the $#$arrayref notation when $arrayref is no longer a variable, you use curly brackets {} so that Perl can tell the extent of the reference:

   for my $j ( 0 .. $#{$criteria->[$i]{'chapters'}}) {

(Even when $arrayref is a variable, you can use curly brackets to be explicit:

for my $i ( 0 .. $#{$criteria} ) {

. And the same applies to other ways of dereferencing: @$arrayref or @{$arrayref}, %$hashref or %{$hashref}, and so on.)

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Great points. I will try both perreal and this one. –  breadwild Sep 11 '12 at 14:37
    
perlmonks.org/?node=References+quick+reference summarizes the rules nicely. –  ysth Sep 11 '12 at 16:06
    
This worked as well as perreal's –  breadwild Sep 11 '12 at 16:15
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It is often easier to iterate over data structures like this rather than get the indicies of all of the levels (like your code was doing). This lets you handle each level by itself:

for my $criterion (@$criteria) {
    print "$criterion->{title}\n";
    for my $chapter (@{ $criterion->{chapters} }) {
        print "\t$chapter->{title}\n";
    }
}

As a side note, the tot_chaps key is dangerous if this is not a read-only data structure. It is very easy for it to get out of sync with $criterion->{chapters} and duplicates the information already stored in the array:

my $total_chapters = @{ $criterion->{chapters} };
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