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I was just looking at an example, and in it I saw the code

return new IntPtr(handle);

After poking around our code, I found that we have already used a similar pattern, but in our code we had almost the same thing:

return (IntPtr)handle;

Is there a difference between those two takes? Will the second one be "better" in any way, since it doesn't allocate new memory, or is the cast just hiding the same constructor underneath?

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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In your examples, I'm guessing handle is an integer value? IntPtr declares an explicit conversion from Int32 (int) and Int64 (long) which simply calls the same constructor:

public static explicit operator IntPtr(int value)
{
    return new IntPtr(value);
}

So there is effectively no difference other than possible readability concerns.

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Reflector says that the cast is calling the constructor under the hood anyway:

[Serializable, StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential), ComVisible(true)]
public struct IntPtr : ISerializable
{
    ...

    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    public static explicit operator IntPtr(int value)
    {
        return new IntPtr(value);
    }

}
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Since IntPtr is a value type, using new does not allocate any memory.

Technically, the calls still compile down to different IL - one actually calls the constructor, another calls the explicit conversion operator. I'm not sure if there's any actual difference between those two after a JIT pass, however - most likely none (though I doubt you'd notice either way in practice, this being a femtooptimization).

In any case, cast is more idiomatic than using a constructor, so I'd suggest going with it for that reason alone.

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The fact that IntPtr is a value type doesn't mean new won't allocate memory. In fact, using new should be preferred to ensure that the struct is properly initialized. –  Scott Dorman Aug 6 '09 at 5:40
    
I think what Pavel meant, was that it doesn't use any memory that wouldn't have also been used otherwise. Obviously, copying a value type will mean more memory will be used :) –  Thorarin Aug 6 '09 at 6:16
    
There's absolutely no benefit that using (or not using) new will give you to ensure that struct is properly initialized. For starters, you cannot have an "improperly initialized struct" in the first place, since compiler will enforce initialization for locals, and default-initialize everything else. –  Pavel Minaev Aug 6 '09 at 7:31
    
Also, it is very unlikely that any copying will actually take place here. It will just use a single register (or two on 32-bit machine) to store the value directly, and return it immediately. –  Pavel Minaev Aug 6 '09 at 7:31
    
Pavel, I realize I wasn't entirely clear by what I meant. If you use a struct that contains public properties rather than fields you will get an "Use of unassigned variable" compiler error if you don't provide values for all of the properties when you use it. You can get around this by newing the struct. public struct T { public string S { get; set; } public int I { get; set; } } T t; t.S = "hello"; Will result in a compiler error, but T t = new T(); t.S = "hello"; will not. –  Scott Dorman Aug 6 '09 at 17:04
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So this thread is all talk and no numbers so lets talk metrics. I ran some test code to get some performance metrics using Visual Studio 2010 and

I got these metrics by calculating the average time of either method over 10 test runs with 10 million iterations each in Debug then Release mode (non optimized then optimized):

(Debug) Casting Method: ~32 ms Allocation Method: ~26 ms

(Release) Casting Method: ~20 ms Allocation Method: ~22 ms

What is also interesting is to compare these metrics to similar code with managed C++ only using gcnew and the results are much different.

Same setup again. Except comparing the casting method: "IntPtr^ ptr = (IntPtr) i;" vs the allocation method: "IntPtr^ ptr = (IntPtr) i;".

(Debug) Casting Method: ~91ms Allocation Method: ~127ms

(Release) Casting Method: ~22ms Allocation Method: ~124ms

Now if you are scratching your head saying well why is C# so much faster than managed C++ and the answer is it isn't. The most efficient way to use IntPtr is as value type not a reference to a value type. For instance like so "IntPtr ptr = (IntPtr) i;". This would give you ~24ms (Debug more) or (~22 Release mode). See how it was optimized above by the compiler to get the 22ms rather than the 90ms.

Conclusion in C#, unless you are looking at REALLY REALLY tight code it doesn't matter. I think with my code in Release it was actually optimizing the cast right out because commenting out the cast gave the same ~22ms. But for the most part compiler has your back on this one in C# well at least VS 2010 does. However, in Managed C++/CLI if you are looking at code with even minimal performance constraints then watch out. The compiler will not automatically optimize gcnew allocations to the casting approach and it's almost 6 times faster... I actually ran into this particular problem in C++/CLI which is what led me to post on this thread when dealing with some real-time audio processing. My code (C#): (My managed C++ code was very similar except I had to write Average() myself and used console to output rather than message boxes).

    static void Main()
    {
        List<int> castTimings = new List<int>();
        List<int> allocTimings = new List<int>();

        for (int i = 0; i < TEST_RUNS; ++i)
        {
            castTimings.Add(RunCastMethod().Milliseconds);
            allocTimings.Add(RunAllocationMethod().Milliseconds);
        }

        MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Casting Method took: {0}ms", castTimings.Average() ));
        MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Allocation Method took: {0}ms", allocTimings.Average() ));
    }

    private static TimeSpan RunAllocationMethod() {
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        for (int i = 0; i < TEST_ITERATIONS; ++i)
        {
            IntPtr ptr = new IntPtr(i);
        }

        return ( DateTime.Now - start );
    }

    private static TimeSpan RunCastMethod()
    {
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        for (int i = 0; i < TEST_ITERATIONS; ++i)
        {
            IntPtr ptr = (IntPtr) i;
        }

        return (DateTime.Now - start);
    }
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Thanks for the effort mede –  Noam Gal Dec 14 '10 at 5:51
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