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int max(int n, ...)

I am using cdecl calling convention where the caller cleans up the variable after the callee returns.

I am interested in knowing how do the macros va_end, va_start and va_arg work?

Does the caller pass in the address of the array of arguments as the second argument to max?

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you look at the way the C language stores the parameters on the stack, the way the macros work should become clear:-

Higher memory address    Last parameter
                         Penultimate parameter
                         ....
                         Second parameter
Lower memory address     First parameter
       StackPointer  ->  Return address

(note, depending on the hardware the stack pointer maybe one line down and the higher and lower may be swapped)

The arguments are always stored like this1, even without the ... parameter type.

The va_start macro just sets up a pointer to the first function parameter, e.g.:-

 void func (int a, ...)
 { 
   // va_start
   char *p = (char *) &a + sizeof a;
 }

which makes p point to the second parameter. The va_arg macro does this:-

 void func (int a, ...)
 { 
   // va_start
   char *p = (char *) &a + sizeof a;

   // va_arg
   int i1 = *((int *)p);
   p += sizeof (int);

   // va_arg
   int i2 = *((int *)p);
   p += sizeof (int);

   // va_arg
   long i2 = *((long *)p);
   p += sizeof (long);
 }

The va_end macro just sets the p value to NULL.

NOTES:

  1. Optimising compilers and some RISC CPUs store parameters in registers rather than use the stack. The presence of the ... parameter would switch off this ability and for the compiler to use the stack.
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This is really quite platform-specific, as many calling conventions (including the common x64, PPC, ARM) pass most of their parameters in registers. Many platforms do not put the return address on the stack, one or two platforms have stacks that grow upwards instead of downwards, and some calling conventions place arguments on the stack in the opposite order. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 11 '12 at 14:32
    
@Skizz: Awesome answer!! –  Bruce Sep 11 '12 at 14:39
    
@DietrichEpp: I know. But hopefully it gets some basics across. I put some notes into the answer to reflect the various ways stacks work. Still, to cover most of the different ways the compiler implements this would take a much longer answer. The simple way would be to find the macro definitions and see they expand to and hopefully there's no spooky compiler magic going on. –  Skizz Sep 11 '12 at 14:41
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As arguments are passed on the stack, the va_ "functions" (they are most of the time implemented as macros) simply manipulates a private stack pointer. This private stack pointer is stored from the argument passed to va_start, and then va_arg "pops" the arguments from the stack.

Lets say you call the function max with three parameters, like this:

max(a, b, c);

Inside the max function, the stack basically looks like this:

      +-----+
      |  c  |
      |  b  |
      |  a  |
      | ret |
SP -> +-----+

SP is the real stack pointer, and it's not really a, b and c that on the stack but their values. ret is the return address, where to jump to when the function is done.

What va_start(ap, n) does is take the address of the argument (n in your function prototype) and from that calculates the position of the next argument, so we get a new private stack pointer:

      +-----+
      |  c  |
ap -> |  b  |
      |  a  |
      | ret |
SP -> +-----+

When you use va_arg(ap, int) it returns what the private stack pointer points to, and then "pops" it by changing the private stack pointer. The stack now look like this:

      +-----+
ap -> |  c  |
      |  b  |
      |  a  |
      | ret |
SP -> +-----+

The private stack pointer now points to the next argument.

This description is of course simplified, but shows the principle.

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Surely va_arg can't pop it off the stack if't sit a caller-cleanup convention. –  Puppy Sep 11 '12 at 14:17
    
@Joachim: Can you give some illustrations or describe you answer in more detail. I can't visualize what you are saying. –  Bruce Sep 11 '12 at 14:18
    
@DeadMG Of course it doesn't, that's why I put pops inside quotations. :) –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 11 '12 at 14:26
1  
@Bruce Modified my answer, hope you can figure it out better now. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 11 '12 at 14:33
1  
That's how it works on a 32-bit platform. On a 64-bit platform some arguments are passed through registers, others on the stack, hence the 64-bit implementation is more complex. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Sep 11 '12 at 14:39
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int max(int n, const char *msg,...)
{
va_list args;
char buffer[1024];
va_start(args, msg);
nb_char_written = vsnprintf(buffer, 1024, msg, args);
va_end(args);
printf("(%d):%s\n",n,buffer);
}
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Thank you for your answer. I am more interested in knowing how is the stack set up for the callee (how is pushed) and how do the macros work? –  Bruce Sep 11 '12 at 14:28
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