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This is related to TFS 2010 Build System. Within our build workflow we set a couple of environment variables using the SetEnvironmentVariable method of System.Environment class. I have confirmed that this environment variable gets set properly on the build server and that it gets set as a system wide environment variable.

The problem is that when MSBuild gets invoked within this WF and it compiles the solutions, our post build events which tries to read this environment variable fail as they are unable to see this environment variable.

Is there a way to force MSBuild to reload environment variables or force a running WF to reload environment variables? My suspicion is that even though WF creates this variable, it does not refresh its Environment state and hence can not see the variable. Further since the WF invokes MSBuild, it passes the same environment state to MSBuild which does ont contain this variable.

Update

Stick the following code in Visual Studio and run it. The delay to SendMessageTimeOut is 10 second so be patient.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace EnvironmentVarTest
{
    class Program
    {
        [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
        [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
        public static extern bool
        SendMessageTimeout(
            IntPtr hWnd,
            int Msg,
            int wParam,
            string lParam,
            int fuFlags,
            int uTimeout,
            out int lpdwResult
        );

        public const int HWND_BROADCAST = 0xffff;
        public const int WM_SETTINGCHANGE = 0x001A;
        public const int SMTO_NORMAL = 0x0000;
        public const int SMTO_BLOCK = 0x0001;
        public const int SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG = 0x0002;
        public const int SMTO_NOTIMEOUTIFNOTHUNG = 0x0008;


        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();
            string environmentVariableValue = DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString().Replace(":", String.Empty);
            Console.WriteLine("On the CMD window that opens up after about 10 seconds, if you type %samplevar% and hit Enter, you should see: " + environmentVariableValue);
            p.SetEnvironmentVariable(environmentVariableValue);
            RefreshProcessVars();
            p.ReadEnvironmentVariable();

            p.StartCMD();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        void SetEnvironmentVariable(string value)
        {
            System.Environment.SetEnvironmentVariable("samplevar", value, EnvironmentVariableTarget.Machine);

        }

        static void RefreshProcessVars()
        {
            int result;
            bool callresult = SendMessageTimeout(
                 (System.IntPtr)HWND_BROADCAST,
                 WM_SETTINGCHANGE,
                 0,
                 "Environment",
                 SMTO_BLOCK | SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG | SMTO_NOTIMEOUTIFNOTHUNG,
                 10000,
                 out result);

            if (!callresult || result == 0)
            {
                int lasterror = Marshal.GetLastWin32Error();
                Win32Exception winex = new Win32Exception(lasterror);
                Console.WriteLine("Exception happened while calling SendMessageTimeOut. The exception message is " + winex.Message);
            }
        }
        void ReadEnvironmentVariable()
        {
            var x = System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("smaplevar", EnvironmentVariableTarget.Machine);

        }

        void StartCMD()
        {
            Process.Start("cmd.exe");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Unfortunately, because the MSBuild process is passed a cached version of the environment variables when it's started up, the command-line functionality of that process will not be able to see the updated values. The best bet you've got, in my opinion, is to either change that variable in the post-build event or store the value in a medium that you can read from the post-build event.

Update

Okay, so the statement below (which can be found here) I think explains where the environment variables are coming from and why you're not getting an updated version in MSBuild.

By default, a child process inherits the environment variables of its parent process.

So, two can play at that game, let's just broadcast that a change has occurred and see if that will take care of it for us. Below is the code that should do that for you.

[DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet=CharSet.Auto, SetLastError=true)]
[return:MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
public static extern bool
SendMessageTimeout(
    IntPtr hWnd,
    int Msg,
    int wParam,
    string lParam,
    int fuFlags,
    int uTimeout,
    out int lpdwResult
);

public const int HWND_BROADCAST = 0xffff;
public const int WM_SETTINGCHANGE = 0x001A;
public const int SMTO_NORMAL = 0x0000;
public const int SMTO_BLOCK = 0x0001;
public const int SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG = 0x0002;
public const int SMTO_NOTIMEOUTIFNOTHUNG = 0x0008;

int result;
SendMessageTimeout(
    (System.IntPtr)HWND_BROADCAST,
    WM_SETTINGCHANGE,
    0,
    "Environment",
    SMTO_BLOCK | SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG | SMTO_NOTIMEOUTIFNOTHUNG,
    SomeTimeoutValue,
    out result);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mike. Is there no way to force build WF to update its cache of environment variables? –  Nikhil Sep 11 '12 at 17:23
    
I have yet to find that API. There is a chance that there is an undocumented API in Windows, but currently Windows still passes a cached version of the variables into each new process. And since the workflow is a different process than MSBUILD, they get out of sync as things change. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 11 '12 at 17:26
    
The question is that when WF calls into MSBuild, does it pass the same copy of env variables that it had when it was launched? If not then surely MSBuild should be able to see the new environment variable which the WF created. Does that make sense? –  Nikhil Sep 13 '12 at 10:13
    
@Nikhil: you do raise a very good point. Let me ponder on that a little and see if we can keep moving down the road to a solution. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 13 '12 at 11:35
    
@Nikhil: I have updated my answer, let me know if it works for you. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 13 '12 at 11:59

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