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<script>
var text = "a's ..a's ...\"... ";
text = convert(text);
function convert( text )
{
    var n = text.replace(/\'/g, "&#039;");
    n = text.replace(/\"/g,"&quot;");
    return n;

}
console.log(text);
document.write(text);

</script>

The problem is that when it replace the second time it take doesnt "remember" what it replaced the first time, so only the last replace is returned.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's because you are replacing the original text string in the second replace, instead of n, which is the value of the replaced text:

function convert( text )
{
    var n = text.replace(/\'/g, "&#039;");
    n = n.replace(/\"/g,"&quot;");
    return n;
}

replace does not modify your original string. Instead, it returns a new modified string . You can also do both replaces in a single statement:

return text.replace(/\'/g, "&#039;").replace(/\"/g,"&quot;");
share|improve this answer
    
Ha! you are right... how stupid of me. – Dennis Sødal Christensen Sep 11 '12 at 14:36
function convert( text )
{
    var n = text.replace(/\'/g, "&#039;");
    // Wrong: n = text.replace(/\"/g,"&quot;");
    // This modifies the previously edited variable.
    n = n.replace(/\"/g,"&quot;");
    return n;

}
share|improve this answer

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