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I have this code

Foo foo = new Foo();
foo.callTheMethod();

Is there any way I can intercept the Foo.callTheMethod() call without subclassing or modifying Foo class, and without having a Foo factory?

EDIT: sorry forgot to mention this is on Android platform.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Have you considered aspect-oriented-programming and perhaps AspectJ ? See here and here for AspectJ/Android info.

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Sorry, forgot to mention this: would this work on Android? –  m0skit0 Sep 11 '12 at 14:48
    
Works like a charm, thanks! –  m0skit0 Sep 11 '12 at 16:38

Use Java's Proxy class. It creates dynamic implementations of interfaces and intercepts methods, all reflectively.

Here's a tutorial.

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2  
+1 for giving an answer with no external dependencies –  Joeri Hendrickx Sep 11 '12 at 14:43
    
Yes, I've looked for Proxy, but in all examples I've seen you have to create the instance (e.g. Foo instance) using the Proxy object. This is not acceptable in my case. I cannot modify the example code shown above. –  m0skit0 Sep 11 '12 at 14:46
    
@m0skit0 If you can't insert the Proxy generation before the method call, then you're right, this solution won't work since you need to replace the Foo instance with the new Proxy instance. Sorry :) –  Brian Sep 11 '12 at 15:40
    
Yes, actually the Proxy class will need to be a Foo factory. Thanks for your answer anyway :) –  m0skit0 Sep 11 '12 at 16:39

Take a look at Spring AOP . You dont have to subclass your class by hand - but Spring will generate them behind the scenes and add code to do the interception.

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Sorry, forgot to mention this: would this work on Android? –  m0skit0 Sep 11 '12 at 14:49

Yes it is Possible through AspectJ. I will explain it with some code snippet:

public Aspect
{
    Object around()call(* Foo.callTheMethod())
    {
        // do your work
        return proceed(); 
    }                       
}
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Thanks, but your answer is basically the same as the accepted one :) –  m0skit0 May 30 at 11:28

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