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I'm looking at the following code

    public IEnumerable<RoleRecord> GetRoles() {
        var roles = _roleRepository.Table.Select(role => role);
        return roles.ToList();
    }

the Table is IQueryable<RoleRecord> Table { get; }

Is there a better way to write this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The Select(role => role) effectively projects to itself - so basically does nothing here.

return  _roleRepository.Table.ToList();

...will achieve the same, or:

return _roleRepository.Table;

If you are happy returning the enumerable and not a resolved list.

This is making the guess that Table is a valid IEnumerable<T> to be eligible for Select() or ToList().

The ToList would fully iterate the Table enumerable, but is returned as an IEnumerable<T>. Consumers of that are going to be iterating the list, which might be cheaper than iterating the Table.

Update: after chatting with @servy, one important difference between returning an IEnumerable<T> (in your case, from Select(role => role)) and returning a List<T> is that with a List<T>, the caller can cast your IEnumerable<T> back to a List<T> and mutate it:

IEnumerable<RoleRecord> results = GetRoles();
var asList = (List<RoleRecord>)results;
asList.Add(new RoleRecord());
asList.RemoveAt(0);

Do note, however, that the self-projection isn't the deciding factor here, it is the fact that you are using an iterator block as the IEnumerable<T> implementation and not a List<T>.

That said, this particular behavioural difference won't be apparent in your case because you call ToList(), so the code in the original answer stands - it is equivalent (and technically slightly faster).

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1  
Note that if you weren't going to just ToList the whole thing then the identity project would serve a purpose; it would prevent the caller from casting the IEnumerable to it's underlying type and performing some actions that you intended to hide. Select will use an iterator block, thus creating an underlying type with no additional (useful) information. –  Servy Sep 11 '12 at 18:00
    
@Servy Sorry, I don't follow. Can you post an example? –  Adam Houldsworth Sep 11 '12 at 18:13
1  
Sure, example. Look near the end, just after, "There are only two points of interest, really:" It would be too much code to put into a comment directly. –  Servy Sep 11 '12 at 18:18
    
@Servy Ah yes I see, you mean they can take the return and cast it back to a List<T>. In this instance it might still be of no use as opposed to just returning .Table, but that entirely depends on what type .Table actually is. I think it is important not to confuse the projection and the Select, the self projection doesn't offer that behaviour, it is simply used because there is no overload of Select that takes no arguments. Interesting either way, I'll amend my answer with a warning. –  Adam Houldsworth Sep 11 '12 at 18:37

There isn't any need to call Select if it doesn't have any filter criteria.

Something like:

 public IEnumerable<RoleRecord> GetRoles() {
        return _roleRepository.Table.ToList();
    }

would be simpler? Calling .ToList() would obviously hydrate the collection but I assume this is what you wanted.

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There are occasions in which an identity Select means something (to prevent the caller from casting the result to some underlying type and modifying it), although this isn't one of those times. Here it is indeed pointless. –  Servy Sep 11 '12 at 17:56

That should simplify to:

  public IEnumerable<RoleRecord> GetRoles() {
        return _roleRepository.Table.ToList();
    }

Basically, a => a is just an "identity" projection, that is, a goes to itself. It really doesn't buy anything in this case.

It is occasionally useful as a placeholder, in some cases, when you don't want an action done. But, in this case, there is no need, because the end result is just to perform a ToList() on the original sequence, which can be done directly without the Select().

This is assuming, of course, that there's nothing else going on between the two lines in the original method.

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I believe you can just write:

public IEnumerable<RoleRecord> GetRoles() {
    return _roleRepository.Table.ToList();
}

If not, then you could try

return (from r in _roleRepository.Table select r).ToList();
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What is the purpose of the second snippet? It's adding in the pointless entity projection again. –  Servy Sep 11 '12 at 17:57

The Select method returns a "projection" - a modification of each individual element of the source enumerable. In this case it projects the element to itself, so it's redundant.

If I had to guess as to the intent, I would say that the select was included, and the query was not inlined with its "ToList()" terminator (forces evaluation of the Linq chain to produce all elements), so that it could be more easily debugged to see exactly what elements were being produced by the query. Or, this query may have originally been written by someone versed in SQL who thinks all LINQ queries should have the parts of a SQL SELECT query.

Anyway, in addition to removing the Select, this query can also be inlined in the return:

public IEnumerable<RoleRecord> GetRoles() {
    return _roleRepository.Table.ToList();
}
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What does LINQ's Select(a => a) do?

It projects each element of a sequence into a new form that contains only the elements you specified ( your 'a').

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