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I have a class with has some miniclasses within it, which act as "storage units" for constants. The problem is, I need some information to assign values to these constants, and I only get that information in the constructor. Unfortunately, the miniclass is not declared in the constructor, and NetBeans tells me that I can't assign to a final variable, even if it's only been declared, not initialized. How should I go about this?

Edit: An example of some code that would have this problem:

public class Car {
    class constants {
        public final String MAKE;
        public final String REGISTRATION_NUMBER;
    }
    public Car(String make, String regNumber) {
        constants.MAKE = make;
        constants.REGISTRATION_NUMBER = regNumber;
    }
}
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3  
Show us some code? –  Nambari Sep 11 '12 at 15:58
    
Sorry; code coming right up. –  Bluefire Sep 11 '12 at 15:59
    
I'm guessing your "miniclasses" will want constructors as well. The outer class constructor then can pass arguments across. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 11 '12 at 16:01
1  
The rule is that all non-static final fields must be assigned by the time the constructor of the class that contains them has completed (i.e. either at their declarations, in an instance initializer block, or in the code of every constructor). –  Ian Roberts Sep 11 '12 at 16:10
1  
This example doesn't make much sense to me - MAKE is an instance variable, and you're trying to refer to it as a static variable in the assignment statement. –  Alex Sep 11 '12 at 16:15
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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What you are trying to do can't work as you need an instance of your Constants class somewhere. One way would be to do as below, but then there is nothing constant about that constant...

public class Car {
    class Constants {
        public final String MAKE;
        public final String REGISTRATION_NUMBER;
        private Constants(String make, String regNumber) {
            this.MAKE = make;
            this.REGISTRATION_NUMBER = regNumber;
        }
    }

    public final Constants constants;
    public Car(String make, String regNumber) {
        this.constants = new Constants(make, regNumber);
    }
}

You can then call:

Car car = new Car("abc", "def");
String make = car.constants.MAKE;

Note: a probably better (and simpler) design would be

public class Car {
    private final String make;
    private final String regNumber;

    public Car(String make, String regNumber) {
        this.make = make;
        this.regNumber = regNumber;
    }

    //getters
}
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6  
The second example is much simpler, and much more likely to be understood by other people looking at the code because it follows accepted Java practices. Making an inner class to hold those fields is overkill. –  Alex Sep 11 '12 at 16:19
1  
@Alex Completely agree. –  assylias Sep 11 '12 at 16:19
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