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The problem is I want to distinguish same elements name with different situation. For example:

<element>Hello StackOverFlow</element>
<element>
  <group>
     <ge>hello g1</ge>
     <ge>hello g2</ge>
  </group>
  <group>
     <ge>hello g3</ge>
     <ge>hello g4</ge>
  </group>
</element>

I want to have elements with text convert into

<div class="text_element">Hello StackOverFlow</div>

and for those elements with child nodes:

<div class="element">
  <ul class="group">
     <li>hello g1</li>
     <li>hello g2</li>
  </ul>
  <ul class="group">
     <li>hello g3</li>
     <li>hello g4</li>
  </ul>
</div>

So, the problem is how can I distinguish these two kind of elements in writing the template?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use count the descendant elements to see whether or not it has children, e.g. count(descendant::group)=0

The XSLT (assuming a root node xml on your input):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.1" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="html" version="1.0" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="/xml">
        <xsl:apply-templates select="element"/>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- No children -->
    <xsl:template match="element[count(descendant::group)=0]">
        <div class="text_element">
            <xsl:value-of select="text()"/>
        </div>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- With children -->
    <xsl:template match="element[count(descendant::group)&gt;0]">
        <div class="element">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="group"/>
        </div>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="group">
        <ul class="group">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="ge"/>
        </ul>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="ge">
        <li>
            <xsl:value-of select="text()"/>
        </li>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Gives the output

<div class="text_element">Hello StackOverFlow</div>
<div class="element">
  <ul class="group">
    <li>hello g1</li>
    <li>hello g2</li>
  </ul>
  <ul class="group">
    <li>hello g3</li>
    <li>hello g4</li>
  </ul>
</div>
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1  
While not wrong, element[*] is far preferable to element[count(descendant::group)&gt;0] in terms of simplicity, readability, efficiency and the spirit of XSLT. –  Sean B. Durkin Sep 11 '12 at 16:29
    
@SeanB.Durkin thanks - yes, I was being rather explicit. Not quite sure what OP's real 'filter' is. –  StuartLC Sep 11 '12 at 16:32
    
this is the exact answer i want. Thanks. –  KAI Sep 11 '12 at 17:06

One simple way: write one template with match="element[normalize-space(text())]" and one with match="element[*]. The first matches element elements with text-node children that aren't just whitespace; the second matches element elements with element children.

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Silly you, @C. M. Sperberg-McQueen, you only provided the essential elements of the solution. You didn't write the whole stylesheet for him. You'll never get your answers approved that way! –  Mike Girard Sep 11 '12 at 17:32

This shorter and simpler transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="element[not(*)]">
   <div class="text_element"><xsl:apply-templates/></div>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="element">
  <div class="element">
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </div>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="group">
    <ul class="group">
      <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </ul>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="ge">
  <li><xsl:apply-templates/></li>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the following XML document (the provided XML fragment wrapped into a single top element to be made a well-formed XML document):

<t>
    <element>Hello StackOverFlow</element>
    <element>
        <group>
            <ge>hello g1</ge>
            <ge>hello g2</ge>
        </group>
        <group>
            <ge>hello g3</ge>
            <ge>hello g4</ge>
        </group>
    </element>
</t>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<div class="text_element">Hello StackOverFlow</div>
<div class="element">
   <ul class="group">
      <li>hello g1</li>
      <li>hello g2</li>
   </ul>
   <ul class="group">
      <li>hello g3</li>
      <li>hello g4</li>
   </ul>
</div>
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