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OK, we have this sql compare tool that compares two databases and spits out a report of differences in HTML. I need to parse the javascript it creates to find out more details about the differences. For example, if it shows 500 changed stored procedures, I cannot filter by who made the change or when. But if I can parse the JS, I can filter based on such criteria. However, their JS structure is pretty complicated and is mainly nested arrays, sometimes down to 4 levels deep. Here is a sample that shows 4 different records.

var createsql  = new Array(

new Array(new Array(0, "Error, No SQL Availible")),

new Array (
  new Array(0,"-- Stored Procedure", " "),
  new Array(0,"", ""),
  new Array(1,"--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------", " "),
  new Array(1,"/*", " "),
  new Array(1,"Procedure        : Schema.p_procedure1", " "),
  new Array(1,"Description       : This process will do something", " "),
  new Array(1,"Creation Date  : 11/24/2009", " "),
  new Array(1,"Created By       : John Doe", " "),
  new Array(1,"Tables Updated : None", " "),
  new Array(1,"*/", " "),
  new Array(0, "", "")
),



new Array (  
  new Array(0,"-- Stored Procedure", " "),
  new Array(0,"", ""),
  new Array(1,"--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------", " "),
  new Array(1,"/*", " "),
  new Array(1,"Procedure        : Schema.p_procedure2", " "),
  new Array(1,"Description       : This process will do something", " "),
  new Array(1,"Creation Date  : 11/24/2011", " "),
  new Array(1,"Created By       : Jane Doe", " "),
  new Array(1,"Tables Updated : None", " "),
  new Array(1,"*/", " "),
  new Array(0, "", "")
),



new Array (
  new Array(0,"-- Stored Procedure", " "),
  new Array(0,"", ""),
  new Array(1,"--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------", " "),
  new Array(1,"/*", " "),
  new Array(1,"Procedure        : Schema.p_procedure3", " "),
  new Array(1,"Description       : This process will do something", " "),
  new Array(1,"Creation Date  : 11/24/2012", " "),
  new Array(1,"Created By       : Mark Doe", " "),
  new Array(1,"Tables Updated : None", " "),
  new Array(1,"*/", " "),
  new Array(0, "", "")
)


);

I can parse the arrays and get to what I need with this code

var match = "Jane Doe";
var createLength = createsql.length;
var matched;

for(var i = 0; i < createLength; i++){
    if(typeof createsql[i] === "object"){
        var firstArrayLength = createsql[i].length;
            for(var j = 0; j < firstArrayLength; j++){
                if(typeof createsql[i][j] === "object"){
                    var secondArrayLength = createsql[i][j].length;
                        for(var k = 0; k < secondArrayLength ; k++){
                            if(typeof createsql[i][j][k] === 'string'){
                                if((createsql[i][j][k].indexOf(match) != -1)){
                                    console.log(createsql[i][j][k]);
                                    console.log('matched');
                                    //need to grab the parent and search its elemets for the one that starts with the word "Procedure"
                                }
                            }
                        } 
                }

            }    
    }
}

but what I am stuck with is how do I get the parent of the array I am currently at? For example, if my search string is Jane Doe, I want to retrieve the element that says "Procedure : Schema.p_procedure2" which is the second element in a sibling array. Please don't shoot me!

Here is the fiddle

PS: Any other suggestions for improving the loops are welcome, this is just a sample, the list could be much bigger.

share|improve this question
2  
holy nested loops –  Rene Pot Sep 11 '12 at 16:22
    
whomever or whatever wrote that first bit of JavaScript doesn't know how to write JavaScript, and therefor should not be trusted. JSON exists for a reason. –  zzzzBov Sep 11 '12 at 16:22
4  
Short answer to the title: No, items are not aware of the array that they are in. –  Guffa Sep 11 '12 at 16:23
    
wouldn't it just be createsql[i][j]? –  Shmiddty Sep 11 '12 at 16:23
    
@zzzzBov I totally agree. I just inherited this mess! –  hsalama Sep 11 '12 at 16:23
show 6 more comments

2 Answers

I may be missing something, but I think the answer is relatively simple: since you know your array structure, you can access what you're looking for with createsql[i][4][1].

Note: if you want to dynamically search for the item that starts with "Procedure", you can do that with just a bit more code. I think the key answer your question is that you just start with createsql[i] to start your second search from the appropriate parent array.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/nate/DBM7H/2/

console.log('Procedure', createsql[i][4][1]);

Update:

Here is an example of how to find your procedure item dynamically.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/nate/DBM7H/4/

Create a function to look for the item that starts with "Procedure":

var findProcedure = function (record) {
    var i, length;
    for (i = 0, length = record.length; i < length; i += 1) {
        if (record[i][1].substring(0, 9) === 'Procedure') {
            return record[i][1];
        }
    }
}

Then just use that function with the correct record in your code:

// Find the procedure
console.log(findProcedure(createsql[i]));
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot rely on the array that starts with word Procedure to be in the 5th position. It can shift depending on the code inside the procedure body. They merely take every single line in the SP body and put it in an array, so it is never the same. I may never even find it if the developer did not include it, but that's another story –  hsalama Sep 11 '12 at 16:44
    
No problem - then it's just a matter of finding your procedure dynamically. I've updated my answer to show how to do that. –  Nate Sep 11 '12 at 17:02
add comment

If the form of these arrays is constant, I would highly recommend converting them into a native javascript object, just to improve the simplicity of working with them:

var sqlObjs = [];

for (var i = 0; i < createsql.length; i++){
    var item = createsql[i];     
    if (item.length != undefined && item.length > 1){
        sqlObjs.push({
            Procedure     : item[4][1].split(":")[1].trim(),
            Description   : item[5][1].split(":")[1].trim(), 
            CreationDate  : new Date(item[6][1].split(":")[1].trim()),
            CreatedBy     : item[7][1].split(":")[1].trim(),
            TablesUpdated : item[8][1].split(":")[1].trim(),
        });
    }
}

you can then search the array in a much more succinct way:

var match = "Jane Doe";

for (var i = 0; i < sqlObjs.length; i++){
    var item = sqlObjs[i];

    if (item.CreatedBy == match){
        console.log(item.Procedure);
        break;
    }
}

and your life will suck less. :)

You can see this working here: http://jsfiddle.net/5fVqZ/1/

You can implement a simple search to find the value of the item you're looking for like so:

function getValue(byName, arry){
    var val = "";
    // this search assumes that the value will always be in the second position of the array
    for (var i = 0; i < arry.length; i++){
        var aVal = arry[i][1];

        if (aVal.indexOf(byName) == 0){ // only grab the value if byName is at the start of the string
            val = aVal.split(":")[1].trim();
            return val;
        }
    }
    return val;
}

which is used like so:

for (var i = 0; i < createsql.length; i++){
    var item = createsql[i];     
    if (item.length != undefined && item.length > 1){
        sqlObjs.push({
            Procedure     : getValue("Procedure", item),
            Description   : getValue("Description", item), 
            CreationDate  : new Date(getValue("Creation Date", item)),
            CreatedBy     : getValue("Created By", item),
            TablesUpdated : getValue("Tables Updated", item),
        });
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/5fVqZ/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Obviously, if the structure of these array objects is more fluid, you'll need to modify the loop that parses them. –  Shmiddty Sep 11 '12 at 16:50
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