Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want my script to prompt for a password, but I only want it to do so once per day session (let's say half an hour). Is it possible to save the login credentials of a user between script executions securely? I need this to be a bash script, because it has to run on several different types of UNIX, on which I am not authorized to install anything.

I was thinking of encrypting a text file to which I would write the login credentials, but where would I keep the password to that file? Seems like I just re-create the problem.

I know about utilities which run an enrypted script, and I am very against using them, because I do not like the idea of keeping a master password inside a script that people might need to debug later on.

EDIT: This is not a server logon script, but authenticates with a web server that I have no control over.

EDIT 2: Edited session duration

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depending on what the "multiple invocations" of the script are doing, you could do this using 2 scripts, a server and a client, using a named pipe to communicate. Warning: this may be unportable.

Script 1 "server":

#!/bin/bash

trigger_file=/tmp/trigger
read -s -p "Enter password: "  password
echo 
echo "Starting service"
mknod $trigger_file p
cmd=
while [ "$cmd" != "exit" ]; do
    read cmd < $trigger_file
    echo "received command: $cmd"
    curl -u username:$password http://www.example.com/ 
done
rm $trigger_file

Script 2 "client":

#!/bin/bash

trigger_file=/tmp/trigger
cmd=$1
echo "sending command: $cmd"
echo $cmd > $trigger_file

Running:

$ ./server
Enter password: .....
Starting service
received command: go

other window:

$ ./client go
sending command: go

EDIT:

Here is a unified self-starting server/client version.

#!/bin/bash

trigger_file=/tmp/trigger
cmd=$1

if [ -z "$cmd" ]; then
   echo "usage: $0 cmd"
   exit 1
fi

if [ "$cmd" = "server" ]; then
    read -s password
    echo "Starting service"
    mknod $trigger_file p
    cmd=
    while [ "$cmd" != "exit" ]; do
        read cmd < $trigger_file
        echo "($$) received command $cmd (pass: $password)"
        curl -u username:$password http://www.example.com/ 
    done
    echo exiting
    rm $trigger_file
    exit
elif [ ! -e $trigger_file ]; then
    read -s -p "Enter password: " password
    echo 
    echo $password | $0 server &
    while [ ! -e $trigger_file ]; do
      sleep 1
    done
fi

echo "sending command: $cmd"
echo $cmd > $trigger_file
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I am being very stupid, but I don't see how that solves the problem. – BlackSheep Sep 11 '12 at 20:21
    
The password is only ever stored as a variable in the 'server' process, which is complicated to get from a different process, so it's relatively secure. And the 'server' process persists, so you don't need to re-enter the password each time. – evil otto Sep 11 '12 at 20:23
    
To make the credentials time out, you just need to set up a way to kill the 'server' process or send it the 'exit' command after the appropriate time. – evil otto Sep 11 '12 at 20:26
    
I like this solution very much. A single launch for authentication, and duplicate launches for repeated operations... very much what I am looking for. But just to be clear, there is no "simple" solution to this, yes? – BlackSheep Sep 11 '12 at 20:27
1  
Simple from the implementation side? Not so much. From the user side, you could make the server and client into a single script then checks for the trigger pipe and if it's not there then relaunches itself in server mode, otherwise it communicates with an existing server. – evil otto Sep 11 '12 at 20:33

You are correct that saving the password anywhere that is accessible re-creates the problem. Also asking for credentials once per day instead of each time the program runs is essentially the same as not having an authentication system at all from the point of view of system security. Having the password anywhere that is easily readable (whether as plain text or encrypted by a plain text key) eliminates any security you gained by having a password to anyone with decent system knowledge/scanning tools.

The traditional way of solving this problem (and one of the more secure mechanisms) is to use SSH keys in lieu of passwords. Once a user has the key they don't need to ever re-enter their authentication manually. For even better security you can make the SSH key login as a user who only has execute privileges to the script/executable. Thus they wouldn't be able to change what the script does nor reproduce it by reading the file. Then the actual owner of the file can easily edit/run the script with no authentication required while keeping other users in a restricted use mode.

share|improve this answer
    
That would be a great solution if this was a script to logon to a remote machine. However it is used to logon to a web server, so I am not able to use SSH in lieu of passwords - mainly because I do not control the web server. – BlackSheep Sep 11 '12 at 18:13
    
@BlackSheep You're down to either needing a POST page to execute your request, making the webserver provide some SSH keys, or always typing passwords. Anything else and you'll probably be leaving a compromised security system around your script. – Pyrce Sep 11 '12 at 18:23

Usually, passwords are not stored (for security) reasons, rather the password hash is stored. Everytime the user enters the password the hash is compared for authentication. However, your requirement is something like 'remember password' feature (like on a web browser, or windows apps). In this case there is no other way to store the password in a flat file and then use something like gpg to encrypt the file, but then you end up having a key for the encryption.

The entire design of asking the user of his credentials once per day is as good as not asking for any credentials. A tightly secure system should have appropriate time outs set to log the user off due to in-activity especially on back end server operations.

share|improve this answer
    
You're 100% corrent. If I used gpg for encryption, where could I store the key? Then I have a password for all sessions that I have nowhere to put... I changed the session information according to what you said. My original problem does not change however. – BlackSheep Sep 11 '12 at 20:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.