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I often find myself wanting to do something like this, I have something wrapped in try excepts like this

item= get_item()
try:
    do_work(item)
except SomeError as err:
    if err.code == 123:
        do_something(item)
    else:
        # Actually I don't want to do something with this error code... I want to handle in 'except'
except:
    put_back(item)
    raise

Is there a way to raise into the except block below from the else? (a continue would be nice) I end up doing something like the following which isn't as clean

item= get_item()
try:
    try:
        do_work(item)
    except SomeError as err:
        if err.code == 123:
            do_something(item)
        else:
            raise
 except:
     put_back(item)
     raise

Is there anyway to do that?

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Do you control the exception that do_work throws? You could just make a specific exception for error code "123" and catch that to do_something otherwise handle it by your exception block. –  sdolan Sep 11 '12 at 17:15
    
Nope, I thought of that but unfortunately I'm trying to handle specific S3ResponseError error codes from boto –  GP89 Sep 11 '12 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you are using a recent enough python version (2.5 and up), you should switch to using a context manager instead:

class WorkItemContextManager(object):
    def __enter__(self):
        self.item = get_item()
        return self.item

    def __exit__(self, exc_type, exc_value, tb):
        if exc_type is not None:
            if exc_type is SomeError and exc_value.code == 123:
                do_something(self.item)
                return True  # Exception handled
            put_back(self.item)

Then:

with WorkItemContextManager() as item:
    do_work(item)

The __exit__ method can return True if an exception has been handled; returning None will instead re-raise any exceptions raised in the with block.

If not, you are looking for a finally block instead:

item = get_item()
try:
    do_work(item)
    item = None
except SomeError as err:
    if err.code == 123:
        do_something(item)
        item = None
finally:
    if item is not None:
        put_back(item)

The finally suite is guaranteed to be executed when the try: suite completes, or an exception has occurred. By setting item to None you basically tell the finally suite everything completed just fine, no need to put it back.

The finally handler takes over from your blanket except handler. If there has been an exception in do_work, item will not be set to None. If the SomeError handler doesn't catch the exception, or err.code is not 123, item will also not be set to None, and thus the put_back(item) method is executed.

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The "finally" block will run even if there is not an exception raised. I see you put the "if item is not None", but that may not be the same as there being an error message. –  Mark Hildreth Sep 11 '12 at 17:22
    
Hm, I'm not convinced this is a nicer solution that the second example in the question.. I'd have to remember to set item to None everywhere where I handle an exception. Plus the case where item was None to begin with would mask any error handling –  GP89 Sep 11 '12 at 17:32
    
@GP89: The better method is to use a context manager; updated the answer to supply an example. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 11 '12 at 17:41
    
Think this is as good as you can get. there's still the draw back of duplicating handler code in except and in __exit__, it could be put in a function, but still.. Plus someone coming to the code later might be confused why except SomeException isn't receiving error code 123. I think the best solution would be if the language changed so continue had the behaviour in my first example (I think currently continue in an except always raising a syntax error right? so it could be added theoretically) Where can I make suggestions for the language lol? –  GP89 Sep 12 '12 at 14:27
    
@GP89: That the point of a Context Manager: There is no need for an exception handler anymore because the CM is your exeption handler (see the if exc_type is not None: part, no exception means that is not executed). –  Martijn Pieters Sep 12 '12 at 14:29

It's good to keep in mind what try-except flow is for, and one of their advantages is that they remove the need for status variables and status checks like

if not foo:
    # do something

Also, an Exception class should represent a specific kind of error. If you need to make further decisions about the kind of error in an except block, it's a good sign that the class isn't specific enough to represent the program state. Your best bet is to subclass SomeError and only catch the subclass in the first except. Then other instances of SomeError will fall through to the second except block.

share|improve this answer
    
I would, but unfortunately this isn't my code that throws the exception –  GP89 Sep 11 '12 at 17:30

My suggestion would be to create a function (or series of functions) that wraps the method throwing errors which you'd like to control. Something like...

def wrapper(arg):
    try:      
        do_work(arg)
    except SomeError as e:
        if e.code == 123:
           do_something(item)
           # Other possible cleanup code
        else:
           raise

...then, when you want to call it...

try:
    wrapper(arg)
except SomeError as e:
    put_back(arg)
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