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I need to know if I can easily assign a variable within my script from a declaration in a text file. Basically, I want the user to be able to change the variable via the text file to match the numbers needed without having to fiddle with the source code.

Text file input format:

faultInfo = [
             [["L1603",1,5],[271585,972739],[272739,872739, 272739,972739, 271585,972739, 271585,272389, 270999,272389]],
             [["L1605",1,5],[271897,872739],[272739,872739, 272739,972739, 271891,872739, 271891,272119, 270963,272119]],
             [["L1607",1,4],[271584,272738],[271584,272738, 271584,272388, 270998,272388, 270998,272386]]
            ]

I simply want to load this into a list variable with the same name in my script. I am new to Python and not a CS major or anything. I know I could load the 3-D list using loops and whatnot, but it seems like there should be a quick way to do this since the size of the k'th dimension is jagged and will change from case to case.

Thanks in advance.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This data looks simple enough that you can parse it using either json.loads or ast.literal_eval (both in the standard library):

>>> a = """[
...              [["L1603",1,5],[271585,972739],[272739,872739, 272739,972739, 271585,972739, 271585,272389, 270999,272389]],
...              [["L1605",1,5],[271897,872739],[272739,872739, 272739,972739, 271891,872739, 271891,272119, 270963,272119]],
...              [["L1607",1,4],[271584,272738],[271584,272738, 271584,272388, 270998,272388, 270998,272386]]
...             ]
... 
... """
>>> import ast
>>> ast.literal_eval(a)
[[['L1603', 1, 5], [271585, 972739], [272739, 872739, 272739, 972739, 271585, 972739, 271585, 272389, 270999, 272389]], [['L1605', 1, 5], [271897, 872739], [272739, 872739, 272739, 972739, 271891, 872739, 271891, 272119, 270963, 272119]], [['L1607', 1, 4], [271584, 272738], [271584, 272738, 271584, 272388, 270998, 272388, 270998, 272386]]]
>>> import json
>>> json.loads(a)
[[[u'L1603', 1, 5], [271585, 972739], [272739, 872739, 272739, 972739, 271585, 972739, 271585, 272389, 270999, 272389]], [[u'L1605', 1, 5], [271897, 872739], [272739, 872739, 272739, 972739, 271891, 872739, 271891, 272119, 270963, 272119]], [[u'L1607', 1, 4], [271584, 272738], [271584, 272738, 271584, 272388, 270998, 272388, 270998, 272386]]]

You could easily get the string (a in my example) from file.read()

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This is what I was looking for aside from some magical direct 1 to 1. Thank you! –  scorpiknox Sep 11 '12 at 17:46

You can make a single .py file, say configuration.py amd put this variable into this file. If user wants to change numbers in this variable, he or she just need to open this file via simple text editor and correct faultInfo declaration.

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Yeah, this was going to be my last resort. However, I am planning on expanding this program quite a bit and basically want all neccessary data to be lumped into one text file for ease of use. –  scorpiknox Sep 11 '12 at 17:44

A quick and dirty way of doing that is using the eval() function, if you omit the assignment. As exemple, if your file, param.txt is :

 [
     [["L1603",1,5],[271585,972739],[272739,872739, 272739,972739, 271585,972739, 271585,272389, 270999,272389]],
     [["L1605",1,5],[271897,872739],[272739,872739, 272739,972739, 271891,872739, 271891,272119, 270963,272119]],
     [["L1607",1,4],[271584,272738],[271584,272738, 271584,272388, 270998,272388, 270998,272386]]
 ]

A simple way (as I said dirty) of loading it would be:

with open('param.txt') as f:
    file_text = ' '.join(f.readlines()) #Join lines with a blank ' ' space
parameter = eval(file_text)
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Thanks, this is interesting. the more I learn about python, the more I like it. –  scorpiknox Sep 11 '12 at 17:45
    
@scorpiknox just be really careful with eval, someone could write in your file something as "os.system('rm -rf /')", which could be really bad ;). –  Zenon Sep 11 '12 at 18:01

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