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I have recently started reading Linux Kernel Development By Robert Love and I am Love -ing it! Please read the below excerpt from the book to better understand my questions:

A number identifies interrupts and the kernel uses this number to execute a specific interrupt handler to process and respond to the interrupt. For example, as you type, the keyboard controller issues an interrupt to let the system know that there is new data in the keyboard buffer. The kernel notes the interrupt number of the incoming interrupt and executes the correct interrupt handler.The interrupt handler processes the keyboard data and lets the keyboard controller know it is ready for more data...

Now I have dual boot on my machine and sometimes (in fact,many) when I type something on windows, I find myself doing it in, what I call Night crawler mode. This is when I am typing and I don't see anything on the screen and later after a while the entire text comes in one flash, probably the buffer just spits everything out.

Now I don't see this happening on Linux. Is it because of the interrupt-context present in Linux and the absence of it in windows?

BTW, I am still not sure if there is an interrupt-context in windows, google didn't give me any relevant results for that.

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All OSes have an interrupt context, it's a feature/constraint of the CPU architecture -- basically, this is "just the way things work" with computer hardware. Different OSes (and drivers within that OS) make different choices about what work and how much work to do in the interrupt before returning, though. That may be related to your windows experience, or it may not. There is a lot of code involved in getting a key press translated into screen output, and interrupt handling is only a tiny part.

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So the interrupt-context is present in all architectures an is not associated with any process? – Tanmay Sep 11 '12 at 17:45

A number identifies interrupts and the kernel uses this number to execute a specific interrupt handler to process and respond to the interrupt. For example, as you type, the keyboard controller issues an interrupt to let the system know that there is new data in the keyboard buffer.The kernel notes the interrupt num- ber of the incoming interrupt and executes the correct interrupt handler.The interrupt handler processes the keyboard data and lets the keyboard controller know it is ready for more data

This is a pretty poor description. Things might be different now with USB keyboards, but this seems to discuss what would happen with an old PS/2 connection, where an "8042"-compatible chipset on your motherboard signals on an IRQ line to the CPU, which then executes whatever code is at the address stored in location 9 in the interrupt table (traditionally an array of pointers starting at address 0 in physical memory, though from memory you could change the address, and last time I played with this stuff PCs still had <1MB RAM and used different memory layout modes).

That dispatch process has nothing to do with the kernel... it's the way the hardware works. (The keyboard controller could be asked not to generate interrupts, allowing OS/driver software to "poll" it regularly to see if there happened to be new event data available, but it'd be pretty crazy to use that really).

Still, the code address from the interrupt table will point into the kernel or keyboard driver, and the kernel/driver code will read the keyboard event data from the keyboad controller's I/O port. For these hardware interrupt handlers, a primary goal is to get the data from the device and store it into a buffer as quickly as possible - both to ensure a return from the interrupt to whatever processing was happening, and because the keyboard controller can only handle one event at a time - it needs to be read off into the buffer before the next event.

It's then up to the OS/driver to either provide some kind of input availability signal to application software, or wait for the application software to attempt to read more keyboard input, but it can do it a "whenever you're ready" fashion. Whichever way, once an application has time to read and start responding to the input, things can happen that mean it takes an unexpectedly long amount of time: it could be that the extra keystroke triggers some complex repagination algorithm that takes a long time to run, or that the keystroke results in the program executing code that has been swapped out to disk (check wikipedia for "virtual memory"), in which case it could be only after the hard disk has read part of the program into memory that the program can continue to run. There are thousands of such edge cases involving window movement, graphics clipping algorithms, etc. that could account for the keyboard-handling code taking a long time to complete, and if other keystrokes have happened meanwhile they'll be read by the keyboard driver into that buffer, then only "perceived" by the application after the slow/blocking processing completes. It may well be that the processing consequent to all the keystrokes then in the buffer completes much more quickly: for example, if part of the program was swapped in from disk, that part may be ready to process the remaining keystrokes.

Why would Linux do better at this than Windows? Mainly because the Operating System, drivers and applications tend to be "leaner and meaner"... less bloated software (like C++ vs C# .NET), less wasted memory, so less swapping and delays.

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I agree otherwise, but the end about "leaner and meaner" drivers, have anything to back that up, or just FUD? I'd rather say the OP had managed to mess up their installation. – Sami Kuhmonen Jun 10 '15 at 15:21
    
@SamiKuhmonen: I was speaking of "OS, drivers and applications" collectively - not just drivers. It's a general observation based on myriad things. You only have to consider the minimum hardware specs to run different versions of Linux and Windows acceptibly to see the difference. Raspberry Pi and similar tiny cheap devices have been powerful enough to run Linux for years: Windows wouldn't run on similar hardware. Windows Phone offerings have often been sluggish compared to Android (which is Linux based), even with better hardware. – Tony D Jun 11 '15 at 1:52
    
@SamiKuhmonen: and you'll find several websites with hands-on performance comparisons of code written in C++ vs C#, Java etc. - e.g. benchmarksgame.alioth.debian.org - by encouraging a software development environment in which people use virtual machines, Windows has ended up with more bloated software. If you consider all that FUD - fine by me - I consider it obvious. – Tony D Jun 11 '15 at 2:00
    
Considering Windows 10 runs on RasPI and quite a lot of software on Linux is written in Python, PHP etc, I find this discussion closed and FUD. – Sami Kuhmonen Jun 11 '15 at 4:05
    
@SamiKuhmonen: one Windows version that's not even released yet... good one.. and doubtless relevant to Tanmay's experience. Some simple Linux software is written in Python, PHP, even tcl/tk - but major apps tend to be C++, Qt, Gtk, wxWidgets etc.. Anyway, I don't care if you continue the discussion or not - just writing this for consideration by anyone else who reads your earlier comment. – Tony D Jun 11 '15 at 4:17

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