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My question is identical to Is there a Queue (PriorityQueue) implementation which is also a Set? except that this one is about c++ and stl.

Is it possible to use the stl priority queue with the stl set as the container class? If not, is there an alternative container class that I can use with the priority queue to also make it a set?

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5  
Instead of asking how to jam a square peg into a round hole, can you say what it is that you want to accomplish? (Other than breaking off the corners of the peg <g>) –  Pete Becker Sep 11 '12 at 18:06
    
Why do you want to make it a set? Do you want unique membership? –  Kerrek SB Sep 11 '12 at 18:06
    
@KerrekSB Yes, I want unique membership. –  owagh Sep 11 '12 at 18:07
4  
To be a bit more constructive: the container adaptor queue requires a container type that allows pushing new elements at its back and popping elements from its front. std::set doesn't to that; it has its own notion of the order that its elements should be in, so doesn't support pushing and popping. –  Pete Becker Sep 11 '12 at 18:09
1  
The Sequence requirement for the std::priority_queue requires a lot more than just push and pop. owagh you should read up on the container requirements themselves. You can do this, but it will require you rolling a container that establishes the additional constraints you're placing (uniqueness), as I'm not aware of a stock std container that fulfills everything required + uniqueness (which I assume you'd be enforcing by throwing an exception on violation). –  WhozCraig Sep 11 '12 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The specification of std::priority_queue does not allow "unique membership". If you want unique membership in your priority queues, then you don't want std::priority_queue.

If you want a priority queue implementation with unique membership, then std::set already does that, because it keeps its members in sorted order.

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I didn't realise that since set is already in sorted order, it already is a priority queue. Thanks. –  owagh Sep 12 '12 at 13:59

This may not be the most efficient implementation possible, but you could do something like this. (Note I'm not trying to meet the exact interface of std::priority_queue here, not interested in changing the comparison operator, or the underlying container, or the std::set allocator).

Rather than throwing when a duplicate is pushed, this implementation just pretends the push was successful.

template<class T>
class UniquePriorityQueue
{
public:
    typedef typename std::priority_queue<T>::size_type size_type;

    void push(const T& v)
    {
        auto i = membership_.insert(v);
        if(i.second)
        {
            queue_.push(v);
        }
    }

    void pop(void)
    {
        membership_.erase(queue_.top());
        queue_.pop();
    }

    const T& top() const
    {
        return queue_.top();
    }

    bool empty() const
    {
        return queue_.empty();
    }

    size_type size() const 
    {
        return queue_.size();
    }

private:
    std::priority_queue<T> queue_;
    std::set<T> membership_;
};

A main that drives the functions that are implemented...

int main()
{
    UniquePriorityQueue<int> q;
    q.push(1);
    q.push(1);
    q.push(8);
    q.push(4);
    q.push(2);
    q.push(8);
    q.push(5);
    q.push(7);

    assert(q.size() == 6);
    assert(q.top() == 8);
    q.pop();

    assert(q.top() == 7);
    q.pop();

    assert(q.top() == 5);
    q.pop();

    assert(q.top() == 4);
    q.pop();

    assert(q.top() == 2);
    q.pop();

    assert(q.top() == 1);
    q.pop();

    assert(q.empty());  
}
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