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I am trying to take in an input for the dimensions of a 2D matrix. And then use user input to fill in this matrix. The way I tried doing this is via vectors (vectors of vectors). But I have encountered some errors whenever I try to read in data and append it to the matrix.

//cin>>CC; cin>>RR; already done
vector<vector<int> > matrix;
for(int i = 0; i<RR; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j<CC; j++)
    {
    cout<<"Enter the number for Matrix 1";
         cin>>matrix[i][j];
    }
}

Whenever I try to do this, it gives me a subscript out of range error. Any advice?

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2  
you didn't initialize matrix. –  elyashiv Sep 11 '12 at 18:19
    
@elyashiv actually, matrix is initialized. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 11 '12 at 18:20
1  
@Luchian Grigore Vectors are initially empty. thus, the out of range error. –  Samy Arous Sep 11 '12 at 18:24
    
correct. as a vector of zero length holding a vector of zero length =) –  WhozCraig Sep 11 '12 at 18:25
    
@lcfseth so? That doesn't mean it's not initialized. It's an initialized vector object of size 0. Initialization has a precise meaning in C++. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 11 '12 at 18:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

As it is, both dimensions of your vector are 0.

Instead, initialize the vector as this:

vector<vector<int> > matrix(RR);
for ( int i = 0 ; i < RR ; i++ )
   matrix[i].resize(CC);

This will give you a matrix of dimensions RR * CC with all elements set to 0.

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You could create a size RR vector of size CC vectors in one statement and avoid the resizes. –  juanchopanza Sep 11 '12 at 18:46
    
@juanchopanza are you talking about std::generate or just assignment? –  Luchian Grigore Sep 11 '12 at 18:47
5  
Just initialization, something like vector<vector<int> > matrix(RR, std::vector<int>(CC));. –  juanchopanza Sep 11 '12 at 18:52

You have to initialize the vector of vectors to the appropriate size before accessing any elements. You can do it like this:

vector<vector<int> > matrix(RR, std::vector<int>(CC));

This creates a vector of RR size CC vectors, filled with 0.

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+1: That's what I do too. Surprised you're the only one who gave this answer. As an aside, I would never use a vector of vectors to represent a matrix. =) –  paddy Sep 11 '12 at 22:05
    
@paddy I wouldn't use it either. The idea of being able to arbitrarily resize any column or row at any time, or changing the dimensions of a matrix after creation, is too scary for me. –  juanchopanza Sep 12 '12 at 5:38
    
It's normal to change dimensions of a matrix (in MatLab you do it all the time), but in real-world use, the matrix is a contiguous block, and all you are changing is the rows/cols (basically keeping track of stride-lengths) - to index an element in the matrix, you calculate the linear index from your multi-dimensional index. –  paddy Sep 12 '12 at 21:53
    
@paddy I know it is normal but more often than not it is a bad idea. My matrices have fixed sizes and that dramatically reduces the scope for errors. –  juanchopanza Sep 12 '12 at 21:57
    
I think you misunderstood my reply. I was agreeing with you, and providing insight into how real applications do this. You never change the dimension of one row. Most times I've used Matrices outside of MatLab it's been for 3D work, and yes in that case I have a fixed-sized array with no heap allocation. When I really need a 2D dynamic array, I usually grab a single block of memory and dish out my row pointers and data area within that block. –  paddy Sep 12 '12 at 22:14

I'm not familiar with c++, but a quick look at the documentation suggests that this should work:

//cin>>CC; cin>>RR; already done
vector<vector<int> > matrix;
for(int i = 0; i<RR; i++)
{
    vector<int> myvector;
    for(int j = 0; j<CC; j++)
    {
        int tempVal = 0;
        cout<<"Enter the number for Matrix 1";
        cin>>tempVal;
        myvector.push_back(tempVal);
    }
    matrix.push_back(myvector);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Correct, but this suffers from performance penalties due to subsequent push-back. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 11 '12 at 18:27
5  
@LuchianGrigore: Reading a matrix from std::cin kills your argument about performance –  stefan Sep 11 '12 at 21:17

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