Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to write a code that plots the elliptical paths of an object using the equation for the ellipse r=a(1-e^2)/(1+e*cos(theta)). I'd also like this data to be put into an array for other use.

from numpy import *#Imports Python mathematical functions library
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt #Imports plot library
from pylab import *

a = 5
e = 0.3
theta = 0
while theta <= 2*pi:
    r = (a*(1-e**2))/(1+e*cos(theta))
    print("r = ",r,"theta = ",theta)
    plt.polar(theta, r)
    theta += pi/180

plt.show()

The code spits out correct values for r and theta, but the plot is blank. The polar plot window appears, but there is nothing plotted.

Please help. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
One quickly obvious flaw is theta being incremented by 180 degrees (in radians) - don't you want smaller steps, say 1 degree? – DarenW Oct 13 '12 at 2:36
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Do not call plt.polar once for every point. Instead, call it once, with all the data as input:

import numpy as np #Imports Python mathematical functions library
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt #Imports plot library
cos = np.cos
pi = np.pi

a = 5
e = 0.3
theta = np.linspace(0,2*pi, 360)
r = (a*(1-e**2))/(1+e*cos(theta))
plt.polar(theta, r)

print(np.c_[r,theta])

plt.show()

enter image description here


By the way, numpy can do the calculation as a two-liner, instead of using a while-loop:

theta = np.linspace(0,2*pi, 360)   # 360 equally spaced values between 0 and 2*pi
r = (a*(1-e**2))/(1+e*cos(theta))  

This defines theta and r as numpy arrays (rather than single values).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 same answer as I gave :) basically ... plus better info about linspace – Joran Beasley Sep 11 '12 at 18:28

I think you need to do points.append([theta,r]) then at the end plt.polar(points) ... that makes a kinda neat design too

from numpy import *#Imports Python mathematical functions library
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt #Imports plot library
from pylab import *

a = 5
e = 0.3
theta = 0

points = []
while theta <= 2*pi:
    r = (a*(1-e**2))/(1+e*cos(theta))
    print("r = ",r,"theta = ",theta)
    points.append((theta, r))
    theta += pi/180
#plt.polar(points) #this is cool but probably not what you want
plt.polar(*zip(*points))
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping this was Jupiter, but the eccentricity is way too big for that ... – mgilson Sep 11 '12 at 18:34
    
Our answers are basically the same, but our plots are completely different! :) I'm a little perplexed about how to fix (yours or mine?), but since the theta's go from 0 to 2pi, shouldn't the plot make a single orbit? – unutbu Sep 11 '12 at 18:50
    
Ah, our graphs would be the same if you use plt.polar(*zip(*points)) so plt.polar receives two arguments instead of a single list. I'm not sure what plt.polar is doing when given a list of tuples... – unutbu Sep 11 '12 at 18:54
    
lol oh I thought that was just the plot ... I thought it looked neato – Joran Beasley Sep 11 '12 at 18:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.