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I've come across this tricky issue. See the following code:

public class Foo
    public int A { get; set; }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Foo foo1 = new Foo();
    Foo foo2 = new Foo();

    ChangeObject1(foo1);
    ChangeObject2(ref foo2);

    Console.WriteLine("Foo1 = " + foo1.A);
    Console.WriteLine("Foo2 = " + foo2.A);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static void ChangeObject1(Foo foo)
{
    foo.A += 1;
    foo = new Foo();
}

static void ChangeObject2(ref Foo foo)
{
    foo.A += 1;
    foo = new Foo();
}

After some testing, foo1.A is equal to 1, and foo2.A is still equal to 0. To my understanding, this is because the second method has the instance passed in by reference rather than value. This changes the content of the instance, so when a new object is created and assigned in the method, the value is no longer defined.

But thinking about it confuses me as I feel that there should be similar effects in the first method, even if it's passed by value because the content of the instance is still changed outside of the method.

Anyone know whats actually going on? Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I presume that you're using c# or java. either way, the concept remains the same

when you declare your foo variables

Foo foo1 = new Foo()

you're declaring what is called a reference type. (all objects that represent classes are reference types)

so, the value stored in foo1 isn't really a Foo, but it's a value that holds the memory address of that Foo.

when you call

    static void ChangeObject1(Foo foo)
    {
        foo.A += 1;
        foo = new Foo();
    }

you're passing a copy of that reference. Therefore, when you do foo.A += 1, you're changing the member value of the object that you've just passed in.

when you do foo = new Foo(); you're only changing the copy of the reference, but not the original object reference itself.

now, when you call

    static void ChangeObject2(ref Foo foo)
    {
        foo.A += 1;
        foo = new Foo();
    }

you're not passing a copy of the address of your Foo but you're passing the address of the address of your Foo.

you can think of it as though you're passing the original Foo address itself.

So when you call foo = new Foo(), it doesn't matter what you did to foo before that. You've just over-written your address with the address of a brand new Foo object.

if you change your method to look like the following

    static void ChangeObject2(ref Foo foo)
    {
        foo.A += 1;
    }

then you should notice the change

Here's a page that explains reference types It's in java, but the same principles apply to c# too

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies; the language is in C#. And I see! I just figured that if code in the first method could change a member variable of the original instance even though it is a copy (like you said, an address is passed in), then the assignment of a new instance would also stand, meaning the object outside of the method is still reinialized. How come the member isn't changed only for the copy in the method? – opposite of you Sep 11 '12 at 18:39
    
@oppositeofyou the member is changed, BUT you're no longer passing in a copy of the address, you're passing in the address itself*, so when you type foo = new Foo(); you're over-writing that address. *(technically you're passing an address to the address) – Sam I am Sep 11 '12 at 18:46
    
Perfect, thanks a lot :) – opposite of you Sep 11 '12 at 19:49
    
"all user-defined objects are reference types" I disagree, struct are not ref types they are value types – Vamsi Sep 12 '12 at 6:04

Perhaps if you think about it in terms of a value type instead of a reference type it would help. Take the first example (number in brackets represents a memory address which holds an integer value).

Passing by Value

[0001] -> 5;

When you pass by value, the value 5 is copied to a new memory address

[0002] -> 5;    
[0002] -> 10;    // changes the value of a new reference

Changing the value of [0002] will not affect [0001].


Passing by Reference

[0001] -> 5;

On the other hand if you pass the address itself (passing with the ref keyword)

[0001] -> 5;    
[0001] -> 10;    // changes the value of the original reference

You can now change the value the reference is holding.


Reference types instead of holding an integer hold an address to an object. So it stands that if you pass by reference you are passing the 'container' (ie pointer/reference) which holds the value. You can then change what the container holds. If you pass by value, you are taking the value out of the container and passing it, then the original container is out of the picture.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is even more confusing, because it uses value types (integers), while the question uses reference types. – Chris Pitman Sep 12 '12 at 5:41
    
I clearly state why the example uses value types. It is easier to see what is happening and is the exact same concept when passing with the ref keyword. Which sounds more confusing, A container that holds a value, or a container that holds a container that holds a value? Yet the concept of passing a container, or the value it holds remains the same. Feel free to replace the integers with long hexadecimal memory addresses if that makes it easier for you to understand, it's irrelevant to the point. – Despertar Sep 12 '12 at 5:56

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