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Let's say I have the following class X where I want to return access to an internal member:

class Z
{
    // details
};

class X
{
    std::vector<Z> vecZ;

public:
    Z& Z(size_t index)
    {
        // ...
        // massive amounts of code for
        // validating index

        Z& ret = vecZ[index];

        // even more code for determining that
        // the Z instance at index is *just*
        // the right sort of Z (a process which
        // involves calculating leap years in which
        // religious holidays fall on Tuesdays for
        // the next thousand years or so)
        // ...

        return ret;
    }
    const Z& Z(size_t index) const
    {
        // identical to non-const X::Z(), except
        // printed in a lighter shade of gray since
        // we're running low on toner by this point
        // ...
    }
};

The two member functions 'X::Z()' and 'X::Z() const' have identical code inside the braces. This is duplicate code and can cause maintenance problems for long functions with complex logic.

Is there a way to avoid this code duplication?

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In this example I would return a value in the const case so you can't the refactoring below. int Z() const { return z; } –  Matt Price Sep 23 '08 at 20:50
    
For fundamental types, you're absolutely correct! My first example wasn't very good. Let's say that instead we're returning some class instance instead. (I updated the question to reflect this.) –  Kevin Sep 23 '08 at 21:02
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9 Answers

For a detailed explanation, please see the heading "Avoid Duplication in const and Non-const Member Function," on p. 23, in Item 3 "Use const whenever possible," in Effective C++, 3d ed by Scott Meyers, ISBN-13: 9780321334879.

alt text

Here's Meyers' solution (simplified):

struct C {
    const char & get() const { return c; }
    char & get() {
        return const_cast<char &>( static_cast<const C &>( *this ).get() );
    }
    char c;
};

The two casts and function call may be ugly but it's correct. Meyers has a thorough explanation why.

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3  
Nobody ever got fired for following Scott Meyers :-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 23 '08 at 22:15
3  
Ouch... you may already be in trouble if you're counting on const == ROM. Compilers just aren't good enough to prove such a strong assertion. –  Adam Mitz Sep 24 '08 at 0:30
3  
witkamp is correct that in general it's bad to use const_cast. This is a specific case where it isn't, as Meyers explains. @Adam: ROM => const is fine. const == ROM is obviously nonsense since anyone can cast non-const to const willy-nilly: it's equivalent to just choosing not to modify something. –  Steve Jessop Sep 24 '08 at 2:35
9  
In general I would suggest using const_cast instead of static_cast to add const since it prevents you from changing the type accidentally. –  Greg Rogers Nov 23 '08 at 7:49
1  
@HelloGoodbye: I think Meyers assumes a modicum of intelligence from the designer of the class interface. If get()const returns something that was defined as a const object, then there should not be a non-const version of get() at all. Actually my thinking on this has changed over time: the template solution is the only way to avoid duplication and get compiler-checked const-correctness, so personally I would no longer use a const_cast in order to avoid duplicating code, I'd choose between putting the duped code into a function template or else leaving it duped. –  Steve Jessop Apr 5 '13 at 9:37
show 3 more comments
up vote 27 down vote accepted

Yes, it is possible to avoid the code duplication. You need to use the const member function to have the logic and have the non-const member function call the const member function and re-cast the return value to a non-const reference (or pointer if the functions returns a pointer):

class X
{
   std::vector<Z> vecZ;

public:
   const Z& Z(size_t index) const
   {
      // same really-really-really long access 
      // and checking code as in OP
      // ...
      return vecZ[index];
   }

   Z& Z(size_t index)
   {
      // One line. One ugly, ugly line - but just one line!
      return const_cast<Z&>( static_cast<const X&>(*this).Z(index) );
   }

 #if 0 // A slightly less-ugly version
   Z& Z(size_t index)
   {
      // Two lines -- one cast. This is slightly less ugly but takes an extra line.
      const X& constMe = *this;
      return const_cast<Z&>( constMe.Z(index) );
   }
 #endif
};

NOTE: It is important that you do NOT put the logic in the non-const function and have the const-function call the non-const function -- it may result in undefined behavior. The reason is that a constant class instance gets cast as a non-constant instance. The non-const member function may accidentally modify the class, which the C++ standard states will result in undefined behavior.

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1  
Wow... that's horrible. You just increased the amount of code, decreased the clarity, and added two stinkin' const_cast<>s. Perhaps you have an example in mind where this actually makes sense? –  Shog9 Sep 23 '08 at 20:50
4  
Hey don't ding this!, it may be ugly, but according to Scott Meyers, it is (almost) the correct way. See Effective C++, 3d ed, Item 3 under the heading "Avoiding duplication in const and non-cost member functions. –  jwfearn Sep 23 '08 at 21:06
2  
While I understand that the solution may be ugly, imagine that the code that determines what to return is 50 lines long. Then duplication is highly undesirable -- especially when you have to re-factor the code. I've encountered this many times in my career. –  Kevin Sep 23 '08 at 21:06
1  
Kevin - you need at least an edit #6 - in the ugly set of casts you have "const_cast<int&>" which should be "const_cast<Z&>" –  Michael Burr Sep 23 '08 at 21:59
3  
The difference between this and Meyers is that Meyers has static_cast<const X&>(*this). const_cast is for removing const, not adding it. –  Steve Jessop Sep 23 '08 at 22:14
show 6 more comments

A bit more verbose than Meyers, but I might do this:

class X {

    private:

    // This method MUST NOT be called except from boilerplate accessors.
    Z &_getZ(size_t index) const {
        return something;
    }

    // boilerplate accessors
    public:
    Z &getZ(size_t index)             { return _getZ(index); }
    const Z &getZ(size_t index) const { return _getZ(index); }
};

The private method has the undesirable property that it returns a non-const Z& for a const instance, which is why it's private. Private methods may break invariants of the external interface (in this case the desired invariant is "a const object cannot be modified via references obtained through it to objects it has-a").

Note that the comments are part of the pattern - _getZ's interface specifies that it is never valid to call it (aside from the accessors, obviously): there's no conceivable benefit to doing so anyway, because it's 1 more character to type and won't result in smaller or faster code. Calling the method is equivalent to calling one of the accessors with a const_cast, and you wouldn't want to do that either. If you're worried about making errors obvious (and that's a fair goal), then call it const_cast_getZ instead of _getZ.

By the way, I appreciate Meyers's solution. I have no philosophical objection to it. Personally, though, I prefer a tiny bit of controlled repetition, and a private method that must only be called in certain tightly-controlled circumstances, over a method that looks like line noise. Pick your poison and stick with it.

[Edit: Kevin has rightly pointed out that _getZ might want to call a further method (say generateZ) which is const-specialised in the same way getZ is. In this case, _getZ would see a const Z& and have to const_cast it before return. That's still safe, since the boilerplate accessor polices everything, but it's not outstandingly obvious that it's safe. Furthermore, if you do that and then later change generateZ to always return const, then you also need to change getZ to always return const, but the compiler won't tell you that you do.

That latter point about the compiler is also true of Meyers's recommended pattern, but the first point about a non-obvious const_cast isn't. So on balance I think that if _getZ turns out to need a const_cast for its return value, then this pattern loses a lot of its value over Meyers's. Since it also suffers disadvantages compared to Meyers's, I think I would switch to his in that situation. Refactoring from one to the other is easy -- it doesn't affect any other valid code in the class, since only invalid code and the boilerplate calls _getZ.]

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This still has the problem that the thing you return may be constant for a constant instance of X. In that case, you still require a const_cast in _getZ(...). If misused by later developers, it can still lead to UB. If the thing that is being returned is 'mutable', then this is a good solution. –  Kevin Sep 24 '08 at 0:48
    
When I said that '_getZ(...)' may be mis-used, I meant that if a future developer didn't understand that it was only to be used by the public functions and called it directly, but modified the value in a constant instance of X, then that could lead to UB. This is possible if not documented well. –  Kevin Sep 24 '08 at 0:50
    
Any private function (heck, public ones too) can be mis-used by later developers, if they choose to ignore the BLOCK CAPITAL instructions on its valid use, in the header file and also in Doxygen etc. I can't stop that, and I don't consider it my problem since the instructions are easy to understand. –  Steve Jessop Sep 24 '08 at 1:44
2  
-1: This doesn't work in many situations. What if something in the _getZ() function is an instance variable? The compiler (or at least some compilers) will complain that since _getZ() is const, any instance variable referenced within is const too. So something would then be const (it would be of type const Z&) and could not be converted to Z&. In my (admittedly somewhat limited) experience, most of the time something is an instance variable in cases like this. –  Gravity Aug 4 '11 at 21:10
1  
I see. That really diminishes the usefulness of the technique, though. I'd remove the downvote, but SO won't let me. –  Gravity Aug 6 '11 at 22:43
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I think Scott Meyers' solution can be improved in C++11 by using a tempate helper function. This makes the intent much more obvious and can be reused for many other getters.

template <typename T>
struct NonConst {typedef T type;};
template <typename T>
struct NonConst<T const> {typedef T type;}; //by value
template <typename T>
struct NonConst<T const&> {typedef T& type;}; //by reference
template <typename T>
struct NonConst<T const*> {typedef T* type;}; //by pointer
template <typename T>
struct NonConst<T const&&> {typedef T&& type;}; //by rvalue-reference

template<typename TConstReturn, class TObj, typename... TArgs>
typename NonConst<TConstReturn>::type likeConstVersion(
   TObj const* obj,
   TConstReturn (TObj::* memFun)(TArgs...) const,
   TArgs... args) {
      return const_cast<typename NonConst<TConstReturn>::type>(
         (obj->*memFun)(args...));
}

This helper function can be used the following way.

struct T {
   int arr[100];

   int const& getElement(size_t i) const{
      return arr[i];
   }

   int& getElement(size_t i) {
      return likeConstVersion(this, &T::getElement, i);
   }
};

The first argument is always the this-pointer. The second is the pointer to the member function to call. After that an arbitrary amount of additional arguments can be passed so that they can be forwarded to the function. This needs C++11 because of the variadic templates.

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How about moving the logic into a private method, and only doing the "get the reference and return" stuff inside the getters? Actually, I would be fairly confused about the static and const casts inside a simple getter function, and I'd consider that ugly except for extremely rare circumstances!

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In order to avoid undefined behavior you still need a const_cast. See the answer by Martin York and my comment there. –  Kevin Sep 23 '08 at 22:28
1  
Kevin, what answer by Martin York –  Stone Free Mar 3 '11 at 18:46
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You could also solve this with templates. This solution is slightly ugly (but the ugliness is hidden in the .cpp file) but it does provide compiler checking of constness, and no code duplication.

.h file:

#include <vector>

class Z
{
    // details
};

class X
{
    std::vector<Z> vecZ;

public:
    const std::vector<Z>& GetVector() const { return vecZ; }
    std::vector<Z>& GetVector() { return vecZ; }

    Z& GetZ( size_t index );
    const Z& GetZ( size_t index ) const;
};

.cpp file:

#include "constnonconst.h"

template< class ParentPtr, class Child >
Child& GetZImpl( ParentPtr parent, size_t index )
{
    // ... massive amounts of code ...

    // Note you may only use methods of X here that are
    // available in both const and non-const varieties.

    Child& ret = parent->GetVector()[index];

    // ... even more code ...

    return ret;
}

Z& X::GetZ( size_t index )
{
    return GetZImpl< X*, Z >( this, index );
}

const Z& X::GetZ( size_t index ) const
{
    return GetZImpl< const X*, const Z >( this, index );
}

The main disadvantage I can see is that because all the complex implementation of the method is in a global function, you either need to get hold of the members of X using public methods like GetVector() above (of which there always need to be a const and non-const version) or you could make this function a friend. But I don't like friends.

[Edit: removed unneeded include of cstdio added during testing.]

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2  
You can always make the complex implementation function a static member to gain access to the private members. The function need only be declared in the the class header file, the definition can reside in the class implementation file. It is, after all, part of the class implementation. –  Charles Bailey Jan 13 '09 at 17:49
    
Aah yes good idea! I don't like the template stuff appearing in the header, but if since here it potentially makes the implemtation quite a lot simpler it is probably worth it. –  Andy Balaam Jan 14 '09 at 9:15
    
+ 1 to this solution which doesn't duplicate any code, nor uses any ugly const_cast (which could accidentally be used to canst something that is actually supposed to be const to something that is not). –  HelloGoodbye Apr 4 '13 at 20:01
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Nice question and nice answers. I have another solution, that uses no casts:

class X {

private:

    std::vector<Z> v;

    template<typename InstanceType>
    static auto get(InstanceType& instance, std::size_t i) -> decltype(instance.get(i)) {
        // massive amounts of code for validating index
        // the instance variable has to be used to access class members
        return instance.v[i];
    }

public:

    const Z& get(std::size_t i) const {
        return get(*this, i);
    }

    Z& get(std::size_t i) {
        return get(*this, i);
    }

};

However, it has the ugliness of requiring a static member and the need of using the instance variable inside it.

I did not consider all the possible (negative) implications of this solution. Please let me know if any.

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Typically, the member functions for which you need const and non-const versions are getters and setters. Most of the time they are one-liners so code duplication is not an issue.

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2  
That may be true most of the time. But there are exceptions. –  Kevin Sep 23 '08 at 21:14
1  
getters anyway, a const setter doesn't make much sense ;) –  jwfearn Sep 23 '08 at 21:46
    
I meant that the non-const getter is effectively a setter. :) –  Dima Sep 23 '08 at 22:00
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This DDJ article shows a way using template specialization that doesn't require you to use const_cast. For such a simple function it really isn't needed though.

boost::any_cast (at one point, it doesn't any more) uses a const_cast from the const version calling the non-const version to avoid duplication. You can't impose const semantics on the non-const version though so you have to be very careful with that.

In the end some code duplication is okay as long as the two snippets are directly on top of each other.

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The DDJ article seems to refer to iterators -- which isn't relevant to the question. Const-iterators are not constant data -- they are iterators that point to constant data. –  Kevin Sep 23 '08 at 21:05
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