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I know what this message means, I just wondered why it is not an error message, but just a warning?

What happens in this case? For example, suppose I have a function

int f()
{
}

and what happens when I call it?
Does the compiler adds returning of "non-initialized" int in this case?
Or the missing return could cause stack corruption?
Or it's (absolutely) undefined behavior ?

Tested with gcc 4.1.2 and 4.4.3


EDIT: Reading the answers I understand one thing, reading the comments - another..

OK, let's summarize: it's undefined behavior. Then, this means, that it is possible to result in stack corruption, right? (it even means, that my computer may start throwing rotten tomatoes over me through the mic jack, screaming - "what have you done???").

But if so, then why the top answer here says, that stack corruption can't happen and, in the same time, that the behaviour is undefined?

And undefined in respect to? The caller, that tries to use the "not returned value", or just the end of the function is undefined, if it must return value, but it doesn't?

Or it's not undefined behavior, and just the user, who tries to use the value (that is not returned, d'oh!) will "receive" undefined value? In other words - just some garbage value and nothing more can happen?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A: No, the missing return would not cause stack corruption

A: Yes, the behavior would be "undefined" if the caller tried to read and/or use the (undefined!) return value.

PS:

Here's a citation for C++:

C++03 §6.6.3/2:

Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

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5  
Saying the behavior is undefined is inconsistent with your claim that it won't cause stack corruption. It's likely that in some implementations (perhaps even all existing implementations) it won't do so, but "undefined behavior" means that, as far as the standard is concerned, anything can happen -- including stack corruption. –  Keith Thompson May 15 '13 at 17:42
    
While it could happen as far as I know most compilers use eax to return an int. In that case the stack isn't corrupted. –  Dirk May 15 '13 at 18:03
2  
@Dirk: Most compilers generate code for systems that don't have anything called eax. –  Keith Thompson Jun 21 '13 at 18:15

You asked about both C and C++. The rules are different in the two languages.

In C, the behavior is undefined only if the caller attempts to use the value returned by the function. If you have:

int func(void) {
    /* no return statement */
}

...

func();

then the behavior is well defined.

In C++, the behavior is undefined (if the function is called at all) whether the caller attempts to use the result or not. (This is for historical reasons; pre-ANSI C didn't have the void keyword, and functions that were not intended to return a value were commonly defined (implicitly) to return int.)

John Bode's answer already quoted the N1570 draft of the 2011 ISO C standard, 6.9.1p12:

If the } that terminates a function is reached, and the value of the function call is used by the caller, the behavior is undefined.

And paulsm4 cited the C++ standard; quoting the latest 2011 version, 6.6.3p2:

Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

The historical reasons that led to C permitting a value-returning function to fail to return a value, as long as the value is not used by the caller, do not apply to C++, whose design was not as strongly influenced by the need to avoid breaking old (pre-ANSI C) code.

In both C (starting with C99) and C++, the main function is a special case; reaching the closing } of main without executing a return is equivalent to a return 0;. (C permits main to return an implementation-defined type other than int; in that (rare) case, falling off the end returns an unspecified termination status to the host environment.)

Of course omitting the return statement from a value-returning function, or having a possible execution path that doesn't reach a return statement, is a bad idea. It makes sense only in ancient legacy C code that uses int as a stand-in for void, and in main (though even for main, I personally like to have an explicit return 0;).

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The standard considers it undefined.

In practice, memory or a register that has been reserved for the return value will be read. Whatever's there is whatever's there.

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"In practice, ..." is exactly what undefined behavior is all about. –  André Caron Sep 11 '12 at 19:24
    
@AndréCaron I'm always nervous about narrowing down what UB is all about. :) –  Drew Dormann Sep 11 '12 at 19:26
    
@Drew: I'll try! - Undefined behaviour means any behaviour is valid, but as you say normally a function return is provided in an architecture or compiler defined manner (Register R0 in the case of ARM for example). Of course the value in R0 is non-deterministic at the C language level, so even when the mechanism is defined, the result remains undefined. –  Clifford Sep 11 '12 at 19:38
    
@Clifford Interesting. Would you say "undefined value" (or undefined bits) in that case, as opposed to "undefined behavior"? –  Drew Dormann Sep 11 '12 at 19:44
1  
@Drew: See my comment to paulsm4's answer. The behaviour is undefined, but if the actual behaviour is to return a value, that value is likley to be undefined. This is only semantic clarification of what you already said. In C the simplest thing to implement (i.e. least code required) is likley to be what actually occurs. In most ABIs a receiving function 'knows' from where to retrieve a return value, and a function with no explicit return will not unnecessarily generate code to place anything in particular there. –  Clifford Sep 11 '12 at 19:55

C 2011 draft N1570

6.9.1 Function definitions

...
12 If the } that terminates a function is reached, and the value of the function call is used by the caller, the behavior is undefined.

"Undefined" simply means that the compiler is not required by the language standard to handle this situation in any particular manner; any action is considered "correct". The compiler is free to issue a diagnostic and halt translation, or issue a diagnostic and complete translation (which is what you see), or just ignore the problem completely.

As to the actual runtime behavior, that depends on things like:

  • how is the caller using the return value?
  • what is the calling convention being used?
  • how does the underlying architecture behave?

etc.

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I'm not sure if the compiler is allowed not to complete translation. Your cite of the draft refers only to the runtime behavior, not the ill-formedness of the program. –  rodrigo Sep 11 '12 at 21:47
1  
@rodrigo: 3.4.3/2:"NOTE Possible undefined behavior ranges from ignoring the situation completely with unpredictable results, to behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment (with or without the issuance of a diagnostic message), to terminating a translation or execution (with the issuance of a diagnostic message).". Emphasis mine. –  John Bode Sep 11 '12 at 22:02
    
The common interpretation of UB is that the program behaves well-defined as long as the code invoking it isn't reached. So, it must compile (and the program is well-defined as long as the function which uses the return value of a function not returning anything isn't called, but only has its address taken, for example). –  mafso Dec 19 '14 at 14:41

The compiler is not required to diagnose this because in some cases it's hard. So the rule is that the behavior is undefined.

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I conducted a simple test On Linux 64 bit, GCC 4.63 Let's see in practice how does GCC assemble such a thing..

I created an simple example

This is the test.c with normal return value

int main()
{
    return 0;
}

This is the GCC assembler output for test.c:

main:
.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    $0, %eax
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

This is the test2.c with no return value

int main()
{
}

This is GCC assembler output for test2.c:

main:
.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

Basically we can see that the following line is missing.

    movl    $0, %eax

This line moves a value to eax register which is the return value of the function. If the function was used in real life situation, the eax register which probably contains garbage value would represent the return value of main()...

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1  
There are special rules for the "main" function, so this test is pointless. –  gnasher729 Mar 16 '14 at 17:31
    
Please elaborate –  stdcall Mar 16 '14 at 17:33

I did the test in g++. It seems that you get an object with random stuff in it, i.e. it does dot not call any constructor. When I'm only dealing with integers, that means that I get a random number. When I deal with strings, I get a segmentation violation. I don't know if that's what you meant by corruption, but it's bad.

As for your first question, I'd go even further. I want to know why this is a warning that is disabled by default! It seems pretty important to me.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class X
{
private:
  int _x;
public:
  X(int x) : _x(x) { } // No default construcor!                            
  int get() const { return _x; }
};

X test1(int x)
{
  if (x > 0)
    return X(x);
  // warning: control reaches end of non-void function                      
}

class Y
{
private:
  std::string _y;
public:
  Y(std::string y) : _y(y) { } // No default construcor!                    
  std::string get() const { return _y; }
};

Y test2(std::string y)
{
  if (y.length() > 3)
    return Y(y);
  // warning: control reaches end of non-void function                      
}

int main(int, char**)
{
  std::cout<<"4 -> "<<test1(4).get()<<std::endl;
  std::cout<<"-4 -> "<<test1(-4).get()<<std::endl;
  std::cout<<"stop -> "<<test2("stop").get()<<std::endl;
  std::cout<<"go -> "<<test2("go").get()<<std::endl;
}
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