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I have a table called datetest

CREATE TABLE "DATETEST"."DATETEST" 
   ("FNAME" VARCHAR2(20 BYTE), 
"DOB" DATE, 
"STAFFNO" NUMBER NOT NULL ENABLE, 
 CONSTRAINT "DATETEST_PK" PRIMARY KEY ("STAFFNO"));

with the following data

INSERT INTO "DATETEST"."DATETEST" (FNAME, DOB, STAFFNO) VALUES ('John', TO_DATE('01-   OCT-45', 'DD-MON-RR'), '1')
INSERT INTO "DATETEST"."DATETEST" (FNAME, DOB, STAFFNO) VALUES ('Ann', TO_DATE('01-NOV-60', 'DD-MON-RR'), '2')
INSERT INTO "DATETEST"."DATETEST" (FNAME, DOB, STAFFNO) VALUES ('David', TO_DATE('24-MAR-58', 'DD-MON-RR'), '3')
INSERT INTO "DATETEST"."DATETEST" (FNAME, DOB, STAFFNO) VALUES ('Mary', TO_DATE('19-FEB-70', 'DD-MON-RR'), '4')
INSERT INTO "DATETEST"."DATETEST" (FNAME, DOB, STAFFNO) VALUES ('Susan', TO_DATE('03-JUN-40', 'DD-MON-RR'), '5')
INSERT INTO "DATETEST"."DATETEST" (FNAME, DOB, STAFFNO) VALUES ('Julie', TO_DATE('13-JUN-65', 'DD-MON-RR'), '6')

when i do execute the following query

select * from datatest order by dob desc 

i get the following result

FNAME                DOB       STAFFNO
-------------------- --------- -------
John                 01-OCT-45       1 
Susan                03-JUN-40       5 
Mary                 19-FEB-70       4 
Julie                13-JUN-65       6 
Ann                  01-NOV-60       2 
David                24-MAR-58       3 

I cannot figure out how to get the correct order. How do I query the correct order?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your data is in chronological order. The problem is that you are using 'DD-MM-RRRR' instead of 'DD-MM-YY' for the conversion.

The 'RRRR' version uses particular rules to get the century. So, your first row is 2045-10-01, not 1945-20-01.

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How would I use the 'DD-MM-YY' and get 1945 instead of 2045 while sorting? –  Aashish Shrestha Sep 11 '12 at 19:37
    
The problem is in the isnert statement, where you have TO_CHAR(). –  Gordon Linoff Sep 11 '12 at 19:44

TO see the actual dates that are stored, please use the following format..

SQL> select fname,
  2         to_char(dob,'dd-mon-yyyy') dob,
  3         staffno
  4    from datetest
  5    order by dob desc;

FNAME                DOB            STAFFNO
-------------------- ----------- ----------
David                24-mar-1958          3
Mary                 19-feb-1970          4
Julie                13-jun-1965          6
Susan                03-jun-2040          5
John                 01-oct-2045          1
Ann                  01-nov-1960          2

This should help you see the "issue". As Gordon pointed out (+1) , this is becuase of the way "RR" is interpreted by Oracle when calculating the actual date.

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Thanks for that quick reply. The above query helped me figure it out. –  Aashish Shrestha Sep 11 '12 at 19:35
    
You are welcome. "RR" works for most scenarios, but there is a good chance of bugs depending on where the data is coming from. Just a good practice to always use "YYYY", IMHO. –  Rajesh Chamarthi Sep 11 '12 at 19:40
    
Just a good practice to always use "YYYY", yes definitely correct... not sure about "RR" works for most scenarios though... –  Ben Sep 11 '12 at 19:48
    
@Ben- You are right. I take that back. "RR works for most cases" depends on the kind of data once deals with. The simple and good practice (which I follow myself) is to use "YYYY". –  Rajesh Chamarthi Sep 11 '12 at 20:08

Do an insert with YYYY instead of RR, because RR adds 1900 only for dates below 1950 and adds 2000 for dates above 1950.

Here the original documentation text

enter image description here

Source: Oracle® Database SQL Language Reference 11g Release 2 (11.2) E26088-01

Have a look in the SQL Fiddle

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What if the data is already in the database and I cannot change it? Is there any way to get the corr datesect –  Aashish Shrestha Sep 11 '12 at 19:44
    
Do you say you have dates above 2012 in your database? Well then you can just update it by subtracting 100 years (or instead of update, change it in the select). –  hol Sep 11 '12 at 19:46
    
By the way, how do you know if the date-of-birth is for example 1905 or 2005? –  hol Sep 11 '12 at 19:52
    
That is true I will need to verify that the current data is incorrect for the ones where dob > sysdate –  Aashish Shrestha Sep 11 '12 at 20:02

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