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I'm starting to use Asp.net MVC. It is recommended to use the <% and %> tags to embed the source code in the HTML, since it's easier to read.

Unfortunately though Visual Studio can't detect any errors in the code at compile time. This is a very bad thing.

For example:

<body>
    <form action="LogOn.aspx">
        <div>
            <div><label for="txtLogOn_UserName"><%= LogOnView.UserName %> :</label></div>
            <div><%= Html.TextBox("txtLogOn_UserName")%></div>            
        </div>
    </form>
</body>

How can I be sure that LogOnView.UserName is a valid statement? As an analogy that code is similar to JS code; you can't know if there will be errors until you run it.

A possible solution could be to create a test project, but I don't like that idea and I don't think I should be forced to create a test project to solve this problem.

Note: This problem will not occur if I use the code-behind coding style.

share|improve this question
    
I don't ensure that ASP.NET Compilation Tool can help me for solving this question. –  Soul_Master Aug 6 '09 at 9:10
    
C# code in an ASPX file is not equal to JS in a JS file. –  Dan Atkinson Aug 6 '09 at 9:16
    
I mean in maintaining term. –  Soul_Master Aug 6 '09 at 10:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use the aspnet_compiler as a post-build action:

C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\aspnet_compiler -v / -p "$(ProjectDir)\"

More info here.

Edit for .NET 4.0 users:

C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\aspnet_compiler -v / -p "$(ProjectDir)\"
share|improve this answer
    
It's work. Thank a lot. –  Soul_Master Aug 6 '09 at 10:33
    
You're welcome! –  Dan Atkinson Aug 6 '09 at 10:59

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