Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a Web application implemented like a set of wizard pages to edit a complex object. Until the user clicks on the "Finish" button, the object doesn't get saved to the back-end system (a requirement), so in the meantime I have to keep the whole information about the object in some kind of a session state.

Also, some of the wizard pages have to show combo and list boxes with potentially large number of items. These items are fetched from the back-end system using a Web service.

Coincidentally, the wizard allows the user to freely jump from one wizard page to any other (using tab links on top of the form), so it's not a simple "next, next... finish" thing.

Additional constraint: the Web application runs on a Web farm and the customer is weary of using server-side session state. In the best case they want to keep the size of the session state minimal (they had problems with this in the past).

So basically there are two problems here:

  1. How/where to keep data entered by the user in the Wizard?
  2. Whether to cache the combo/list items received from the back-end and if so, where?

Options I'm considering:

  1. Storing the object in a WebForms-like ViewState (by serializing it into the HTML page). This would also include the combo box items. Obviously, there could be a problem with HTML pages becoming very large and thus Web application will be slow.

  2. Storing it into server-side session state, regardless of the customer's wishes and without knowing how the performance will be affected until it is tested on the actual Web farm (late in the project).

I cannot decide between the two. Or is there another alternative?

share|improve this question
2  
If you do go down the session state route- create a custom model binder and have the object passed into the controller's action methods. –  RichardOD Aug 6 '09 at 9:32
    
That's what I'm now playing with. In fact I'm thinking about using the same model as the view model and then serialize it in the view code. And then deserialize it back using a model binder. Makes sense? –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 10:01

8 Answers 8

Why cache at all? You could just have the tabbed pages where each page is a div or panel and just display the current div relating to your tab. That way you dont have to keep track and process all the inputs when the user submits the form.

share|improve this answer
    
That's certainly one option and a pragmatic one. I suppose the major downside is the initial page download time. This may or may not be an issue though, and on the plus side the wizard transitions will be instant. –  RichardOD Aug 6 '09 at 9:40
1  
OK, I forgot to mention there's a lot of server-side validation involved. Example: each time the user presses the "Next" button. So if the whole thing is implemented as a single page, then I guess I would have to resort to validation with AJAX, which complicates the design a lot in my case. But it's a valid alternative, I admit. –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 9:49

Is it possible to store the wizard data in a temporary table in the database? When the user finishes the wizard the data is copied from the temporary table and deleted. The temporary table includes a timestamp to remove any old uncompleted data.

share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps as a serialized LOB? –  RichardOD Aug 6 '09 at 9:45
    
Unfortunately, the database is not an option for this. –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 9:46

As Daisy said, it doesn't have to be cached. You could also use hidden form fields. Because these could map to the same object on each controller action, you could progressively build the object through successive pages.

//Here's a class we're going to use
public class Person
{
  public int Age {get;set;}
  public string Name {get;set;}

  public Person()
  {
  }
}

//Here's the controller
public Controller PersonCreator
{
  public ActionResult CreatePerson()
  {
    //Posting from this page will go to SetPersonAge, as the name will be set in here.
    return View();
  }

  public ActionResult SetPersonAge(Person person)
  {
    //This should now have the name and age of the person
    return View(person);
  }
}

//Here is your SetPersonAge, which contains the name in the model already:
<%= Html.Hidden("Name", Model.Name) %>
<%Html.TextBox("Age") %>

And that's pretty much it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeap- another valid option. –  RichardOD Aug 6 '09 at 9:42
1  
In fact my existing design works this way. But the problem is more complex user controls, which are difficult to map in the "hidden" mode the same way as in the "visible" mode (example: a tree view filled from the back-end). Sooner or later you have to resort to using some kind of serialized view state for them if you want to avoid re-requesting the data from the back-end. –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 9:52
    
Why are they more difficult to map? Your tree view example wouldn't be a problem. And I don't agree with your assessment that you will end up needing some form of serialized viewstate. It sounds to me like you've not completely seen the benefits of MVC and are trying to find solutions that fit more closely with webforms. –  Dan Atkinson Aug 6 '09 at 10:22
    
Well you'd need to be able to recreate the whole tree hierarchy from the view's hidden field(s). Another example: how would you store a select box in a hidden mode, so that you'd be able to recreate it (together with all its options) later (if you want to avoid reading the options from the backend each time the page is rendered)? It's possible, but it's not as simple as the textbox example you gave. –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 11:08
1  
Because I'm trying to avoid having either the tree data stored in the Session or refetching it from the back-end on each page rendering. The tree view items are not hard-coded in my code, they have to be loaded from somewhere. This is in essence what I was asking. As for the "benefits of MVC": the main issue is that the Web app I'm working on is supposed to act statefully, but the HTTP is a stateless protocol. And now I have to find the best place where to store this state. WebForms just hide these facts from you, but in the end they use either ViewState or Session state or both. –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 11:26

I can suggest a few more options

  1. Having the entire wizard as a single page with the tabs showing and hiding content via javascript on the client-side. This may cause the the initial page to load slower though.

  2. Caching the data at the server using the caching application block (or something similar). This will allow all the users to share a single instance of this data instead of duplicating across all sessions. Now that the data is lighter, you may be able to convince the customer to permit storing in the session.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what you mean by 2. I don't know why you'd want to use the caching application block in a Web app, when ASP.NET already has a perfectly decent cache. +1 for the client side wizard though. –  RichardOD Aug 6 '09 at 9:45
    
@sabri, it's a Web farm and I cannot know how such caching would behave in such a configuration. It would be risky for me to assume it will be OK and I cannot try it out early enough. As for 1), please look at my answer to Daisy. –  Igor Brejc Aug 6 '09 at 9:58
1  
@RichardOD, My mistake. You are correct; there's no need for the caching application block and the Cache object would be much better. –  sabri Aug 10 '09 at 6:32

There is a lot of resistance in the MVC community against using Sessions. Problems are that a lot of us developers are building login systems like a bank website. One could argue for hidden fields and that works for some situations but when we need to time a user out for security and compliance, then you have several options. Cookies are not reliable. Relying on Javascript timers are not reliable and are not 508 compliant as the goal should be to degrade gracefully. Thus for a Login, a Session is a good option. If you write the time to the client browser, to the server database or server file system, you still have to manage the time per user.

Thus use Sessions sparingly, but don't fear them. For the wizards, you technically can serialize hidden fields passing them around. I suspect the need and scope will become much greater and an authorization/authentication implementation with Sessions will be the crux of the application.

share|improve this answer

If you cannot use ajax (for validation & dropdowns and ability to convert wizard to tabbed page) and cannot use html5 (for dropdown caching and form state saving in local storage), then I think you are pretty out of available "best practices" and you have to resort to bad (or worse) one.

As MVC is opponent of WebForms regarding session usage, maybe you can use a workaround? For example, besides storing all these values in some temporary database records you need to clean up later, you could set up AppFabric extension for Windows Server and use it to store dropdown list items (and scope can be for all users, so if more users are using system at the same time you need only one call to web service to refresh cache), and also to temporary store your objects between steps. You can set your temporary objects in AppFabric to automatically expire so cleanup is not necessary. It can also be of help for speeding up other parts of your system if you extensively call another system over web services.

share|improve this answer
    
I see now that question is 2 years old, so answer is irrelevant now, and it would be irrelevant then as AppFabric was introduced a year later :) –  Goran Obradovic Sep 24 '11 at 23:26
    
+1 nevertheless ;) –  Igor Brejc Sep 25 '11 at 17:46

I've been dealing with the same issue and, while my requirements are a little simpler (keeping state for just a few strings), my solution may work for you. I'd also be interested in hearing others thoughts on this approach.

What I ended up doing is: in the controller I just dump the data I want into the Session property of the Controller and then pull it out next time I need it. Something like this for your situation:

//Here's the controller
public Controller PersonCreator  
{  
    public ActionResult CreatePerson()  
    {    
        //get the age out of the session
        int age = (int)(Session["age"]);
        //do something with it...
        return View();  
    }  
    public ActionResult SetPersonAge(Person person)  
    {  
        //put the age in the session
        Session.Add("age", person.Age);
        return View(person);  
    }
}

The thing I like about this is I don't have to put a bunch of hidden params around on my view pages.

share|improve this answer
    
While that does indeed work, obviously it is an example that needs to end up having abstract class / interface / global.asax / error handling / best patterns & practices.... But yes that works. –  Tom Stickel Sep 1 '11 at 7:25

The answer to this can be found in Steve Sanderson's ASP.NET MVC 2/3, and requires a reference to the MVC Futures assembly. This link to Google Books is exactly what he does.

In essence, you serialize the wizard data to the View. A hidden field is rendered storing all of the acquired information.

Your controller can work out what to do through the use of the OnActionExecuting and OnResultExecuted (to cater for redirects) to pass it to the next view.

Have a read - he explains it much more thoroughly than I can.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.