Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a time interval that spans years and I want all the time components from year down to seconds.

My first thought is to integer divide the time interval by seconds in a year, subtract that from a running total of seconds, divide that by seconds in a month, subtract that from the running total and so on.

That just seems convoluted and I've read that whenever you are doing something that looks convoluted, there is probably a built-in method.

Is there?

I integrated Alex's 2nd method into my code.

It's in a method called by a UIDatePicker in my interface.

NSDate *now = [NSDate date];
NSDate *then = self.datePicker.date;
NSTimeInterval howLong = [now timeIntervalSinceDate:then];

NSDate *date = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970:howLong];
NSString *dateStr = [date description];
const char *dateStrPtr = [dateStr UTF8String];
int year, month, day, hour, minute, sec;

sscanf(dateStrPtr, "%d-%d-%d %d:%d:%d", &year, &month, &day, &hour, &minute, &sec);
year -= 1970;

NSLog(@"%d years\n%d months\n%d days\n%d hours\n%d minutes\n%d seconds", year, month, day, hour, minute, sec);

When I set the date picker to a date 1 year and 1 day in the past, I get:

1 years 1 months 1 days 16 hours 0 minutes 20 seconds

which is 1 month and 16 hours off. If I set the date picker to 1 day in the past, I am off by the same amount.

Update: I have an app that calculates your age in years, given your birthday (set from a UIDatePicker), yet it was often off. This proves there was an inaccuracy, but I can't figure out where it comes from, can you?

share|improve this question
    
If you set the date picker to one day ago, you're off by one month and sixteen hours? –  Alex Reynolds Aug 6 '09 at 19:10
    
yes, one month and sixteen hours off. –  willc2 Aug 7 '09 at 1:19
    
If the result is consistently one month and sixteen hours off, regardless of what value you pick, either you subtract that from the variables, with shifting, or you need to evaluate where that error is coming from. My guess is that something is not right with your interval, if you're always off by that amount. –  Alex Reynolds Aug 7 '09 at 23:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Brief Description

  1. Just another approach to complete the answer of JBRWilkinson but adding some code. It can also offers a solution to Alex Reynolds's comment.

  2. Use NSCalendar method:

    • (NSDateComponents *)components:(NSUInteger)unitFlags fromDate:(NSDate *)startingDate toDate:(NSDate *)resultDate options:(NSUInteger)opts

    • "Returns, as an NSDateComponents object using specified components, the difference between two supplied dates". (From the API documentation).

  3. Create 2 NSDate whose difference is the NSTimeInterval you want to break down. (If your NSTimeInterval comes from comparing 2 NSDate you don't need to do this step, and you don't even need the NSTimeInterval, just apply the dates to the NSCalendar method).

  4. Get your quotes from NSDateComponents

Sample Code

// The time interval 
NSTimeInterval theTimeInterval = ...;

// Get the system calendar
NSCalendar *sysCalendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];

// Create the NSDates
NSDate *date1 = [[NSDate alloc] init];
NSDate *date2 = [[NSDate alloc] initWithTimeInterval:theTimeInterval sinceDate:date1]; 

// Get conversion to months, days, hours, minutes
unsigned int unitFlags = NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSDayCalendarUnit | NSMonthCalendarUnit;

NSDateComponents *breakdownInfo = [sysCalendar components:unitFlags fromDate:date1  toDate:date2  options:0];
NSLog(@"Break down: %ld min : %ld hours : %ld days : %ld months", [breakdownInfo minute], [breakdownInfo hour], [breakdownInfo day], [breakdownInfo month]);
share|improve this answer
    
Actual working code, as opposed to text, is appreciated. –  willc2 Sep 7 '09 at 6:32
    
Thank you kindly sir. –  Martin Jan 28 '10 at 14:19
4  
this method has a problem of going across daylight savings time changes, you will experience a 1 hour problem directly. –  hokkuk May 9 '12 at 21:30

Convert your interval into an NSDate using +dateWithIntervalSince1970, get the date components out of that using NSCalendar's -componentsFromDate method.

SDK Reference

share|improve this answer
3  
+1. To be a bit more verbose for the OP, you can't precisely convert a time interval to these components, you must know where you start from (thus then dateWithIntervalFrom1970), because for instance 29 days are a month if you're on february 1st (except on bisextile years of course) but not if you're on january 1st... –  fraca7 Aug 6 '09 at 12:18
NSDate *date = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970:timeInterval];

// format: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS ±HHMM
NSString *dateStr = [date description];
NSRange range;

// year
range.location = 0;
range.length = 4;
NSString *yearStr = [dateStr substringWithRange:range];
int year = [yearStr intValue] - 1970;

// month
range.location = 5;
range.length = 2;
NSString *monthStr = [dateStr substringWithRange:range];
int month = [monthStr intValue];

// day, etc.
...
share|improve this answer

Here's another possibility, somewhat cleaner:

NSDate *date = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970:timeInterval];
NSString *dateStr = [date description];
const char *dateStrPtr = [dateStr UTF8String];

// format: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS ±HHMM
int year, month, day, hour, minutes, seconds;
sscanf(dateStrPtr, "%d-%d-%d %d:%d:%d", &year, &month, &day, &hour, &minutes, &seconds);
year -= 1970;
share|improve this answer
    
For a time interval of 1 second (one second ago), returns "year -1, month 12, day 31, hour 16, minute 0, second 1". –  willc2 Aug 28 '09 at 4:09
    
That sounds like a bug. –  Alex Reynolds Aug 28 '09 at 6:05

This works for me:

    float *lenghInSeconds = 2345.234513;
    NSDate *date = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceReferenceDate:lenghInSeconds];
    NSDateFormatter *formatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];


    [formatter setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0.0]];

    [formatter setDateFormat:@"HH:mm:ss"];
    NSLog(@"%@", [formatter stringFromDate:date]); 
    [formatter release];

The main difference here is that you need to adjust for the timezone.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for not forgetting time-zone –  James Webster Nov 10 '11 at 11:28
1  
-1 for forgetting anything beyond 24 hours will fail –  Jonny Apr 30 '13 at 6:27

Or there is my class method. It doesn't handle years, but that could easily be addedn though it's better for small timelaps like days, hours and minutes. It take plurals into account and only shows what's needed:

+(NSString *)TimeRemainingUntilDate:(NSDate *)date {

    NSTimeInterval interval = [date timeIntervalSinceNow];
    NSString * timeRemaining = nil;

    if (interval > 0) {

        div_t d = div(interval, 86400);
        int day = d.quot;
        div_t h = div(d.rem, 3600);
        int hour = h.quot;
        div_t m = div(h.rem, 60);
        int min = m.quot;

        NSString * nbday = nil;
        if(day > 1)
            nbday = @"days";
        else if(day == 1)
            nbday = @"day";
        else
            nbday = @"";
        NSString * nbhour = nil;
        if(hour > 1)
            nbhour = @"hours";
        else if (hour == 1)
            nbhour = @"hour";
        else
            nbhour = @"";
        NSString * nbmin = nil;
        if(min > 1)
            nbmin = @"mins";
        else
            nbmin = @"min";

        timeRemaining = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@ %@%@ %@%@",day ? [NSNumber numberWithInt:day] : @"",nbday,hour ? [NSNumber numberWithInt:hour] : @"",nbhour,min ? [NSNumber numberWithInt:min] : @"00",nbmin];
    }
    else
        timeRemaining = @"Over";

    return timeRemaining;
}
share|improve this answer
- (NSString *)convertTimeFromSeconds:(NSString *)seconds {

    // Return variable.
    NSString *result = @"";

    // Int variables for calculation.
    int secs = [seconds intValue];
    int tempHour    = 0;
    int tempMinute  = 0;
    int tempSecond  = 0;

    NSString *hour      = @"";
    NSString *minute    = @"";
    NSString *second    = @"";

    // Convert the seconds to hours, minutes and seconds.
    tempHour    = secs / 3600;
    tempMinute  = secs / 60 - tempHour * 60;
    tempSecond  = secs - (tempHour * 3600 + tempMinute * 60);

    hour    = [[NSNumber numberWithInt:tempHour] stringValue];
    minute  = [[NSNumber numberWithInt:tempMinute] stringValue];
    second  = [[NSNumber numberWithInt:tempSecond] stringValue];

    // Make time look like 00:00:00 and not 0:0:0
    if (tempHour < 10) {
        hour = [@"0" stringByAppendingString:hour];
    } 

    if (tempMinute < 10) {
        minute = [@"0" stringByAppendingString:minute];
    }

    if (tempSecond < 10) {
        second = [@"0" stringByAppendingString:second];
    }

    if (tempHour == 0) {

        NSLog(@"Result of Time Conversion: %@:%@", minute, second);
        result = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@:%@", minute, second];

    } else {

        NSLog(@"Result of Time Conversion: %@:%@:%@", hour, minute, second); 
        result = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@:%@:%@",hour, minute, second];

    }

    return result;

}
share|improve this answer

This code is aware of day light saving times and other possible nasty things.

NSCalendar *gregorianCalendar = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];
NSDateComponents *components = [gregorianCalendar components: (NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit | NSDayCalendarUnit | NSMonthCalendarUnit | NSYearCalendarUnit )
                                                    fromDate:startDate
                                                      toDate:[NSDate date]
                                                     options:0];


NSLog(@"%ld", [components year]);
NSLog(@"%ld", [components month]);
NSLog(@"%ld", [components day]);
NSLog(@"%ld", [components hour]);
NSLog(@"%ld", [components minute]);
NSLog(@"%ld", [components second]);
share|improve this answer

Another way of doing it. Assuming myBirthday is an NSDate object.

NSTimeInterval timeElapsed = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSinceDate:myBirthday];
NSInteger ti = (NSInteger)timeElapsed;

NSInteger seconds = ti % 60;
NSInteger minutes = (ti / 60) % 60;
NSInteger hours = (ti / 3600) % 24;
NSInteger days = (ti / 86400) % 30;
NSInteger months = (ti / 2592000) % 12;
NSInteger years = (ti / 31104000);

This is not flawless do to differing lengths of months but it works for the most part.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.