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Is it okay to use a single MySQLdb connection for multiple transactions without closing the connection between them? In other words, something like this:

conn = MySQLdb.connect(host="1.2.3.4", port=1234, user="root", passwd="x", db="test")

for i in range(10):
    try:
        cur = conn.cursor()
        query = "DELETE FROM SomeTable WHERE ID = %d" % i
        cur.execute(query)
        cur.close()
        conn.commit()

    except Exception:
        conn.rollback()

conn.close()

It seems to work okay, but I just wanted to double check.

share|improve this question
    
Too bad you didn't leave your mistake. I really got confused before reading the revisions because I didn't see what was the misunderstanding Martijn Pieters was talking about. – Tétef Jan 15 at 9:32
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I think there is a misunderstanding about what constitutes a transaction here.

Your example opens up one connection, then executes one transaction on it. You execute multiple SQL statements in that transaction, but you close it completely after committing. Of course that's more than fine.

Executing multiple transactions (as opposed to just SQL statements), looks like this:

conn = MySQLdb.connect(host="1.2.3.4", port=1234, user="root", passwd="x", db="test")

for j in range(10):
    try:
        for i in range(10):
            cur = conn.cursor()
            query = "DELETE FROM SomeTable WHERE ID = %d" % i
            cur.execute(query)
            cur.close()
        conn.commit()
    except Exception:
        conn.rollback()

conn.close()

The above code commits 10 transactions, each consisting of 10 individual delete statements.

And yes, you should be able to re-use the open connection for that without problems, as long as you don't share that connection between threads.

For example, SQLAlchemy re-uses connections by pooling them, handing out open connections as needed to the application. New transactions and new statements are executed on these connections throughout the lifetime of an application, without needing to be closed until the application is shut down.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, you're right. I screwed up my example while watering it down to post it. I'll fix that. – user1334007 Sep 12 '12 at 15:55
    
What would be the problem with sharing connections between threads under my scenario? – user1334007 Sep 12 '12 at 15:56
2  
@user1334007: From the MySQLdb documentation: "If you let two threads use a connection simultaneously, the MySQL client library will probably upchuck and die. You have been warned.". – Martijn Pieters Sep 12 '12 at 19:43
    
That's awesome. I see what you're saying now about how threads and connections should interact with each other. Thanks for the tip. – user1334007 Sep 12 '12 at 23:26

It would be better to first build a query string and then execute that single MySQL statement. For example:

query = "DELETE FROM table_name WHERE id IN ("
for i in range(10):
    query = query + "'" + str(i) + "', "
query = query[:-2] + ')'

cur = conn.cursor()
cur.execute(query)
share|improve this answer
    
That is more efficient, but there are reasons why I'm not doing it that way. – user1334007 Sep 12 '12 at 16:11
    
Alight, just checking. – Scott Bartell Sep 12 '12 at 16:50

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