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I want to get the last row, which I inserted into a table in an Oracle 11g Express database. How can I do this?

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6  
SELECT * FROM t WHERE id = ( SELECT MAX(id) FROM t ) –  Terkel Sep 11 '12 at 21:51
1  
That'll only work if OP's table has id as pk and is an incrementing column. Try "select * from table where rowid in (select max(rowid) from table)" –  MichaelN Sep 11 '12 at 21:55
2  
@MichaelN, rowids are not guaranteed to be inserted in any order. –  Ben Sep 11 '12 at 21:58
    
@ALL - I have a PK with a sequence and trigger to automatically generate row ids. –  sky scraper Sep 11 '12 at 22:00
    
ben, thanks for the correction. i knew that didn't sound right when i wrote it. –  MichaelN Sep 12 '12 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as the "last" row in a table, as an Oracle table has no concept of order.

However, assuming that you wanted to find the last inserted primary key and that this primary key is an incrementing number, you could do something like this:

select *
  from ( select a.*, max(pk) over () as max_pk
           from my_table a
                )
 where pk = max_pk

If you have the date that each row was created this would become, if the column is named created:

select *
  from ( select a.*, max(created) over () as max_created
           from my_table a
                )
 where created = max_created

Alternatively, you can use an aggregate query, for example:

select *
  from my_table
 where pk = ( select max(pk) from my_table )

Here's a little SQL Fiddle to demonstrate.

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The last row according to a strict total order over composite key K(k1, ..., kn):

SELECT  *
FROM    TableX AS o
WHERE   NOT EXISTS (
            SELECT  *
            FROM    TableX AS i
            WHERE   i.k1 > o.k1
                OR  (i.k1 = o.k1 AND i.k2 > o.k2)
                ...
                OR  (i.k1 = o.k1 AND i.k2 = o.k2 AND i.k3 = o.k3 AND ... AND i.kn > o.kn)
        )
;

Given the special case where K is simple (i.e. not composite), the above is shortened to:

SELECT  *
FROM    TableX AS o
WHERE   NOT EXISTS (
            SELECT  *
            FROM    TableX AS i
            WHERE   i.k1 > o.k1
        )
;

Note that for this query to return just one row the key must order without ties. If ties are allowed, this query will return all the rows tied with the greatest key.

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downvote without a comment? I'm curious. –  rslemos Jun 13 '14 at 1:39
    
No idea, this is correct. The language you use is quite dense though. Don't lose the accuracy, but the more people who understand your answer the better. –  Ben Jun 13 '14 at 6:14
$sql = "INSERT INTO table_name( field1, field2 )  VALUES ('foo','bar') 
        RETURNING ID INTO :mylastid";
$stmt = oci_parse($db, $sql);
oci_bind_by_name($stmt, "mylastid", $last_id, 8, SQLT_INT);
oci_execute($stmt);

echo "last inserted id is:".$last_id;

Tip: you have to use your id column name in {your_id_col_name} below...

"RETURNING {your_id_col_name} INTO :mylastid"
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