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I have array from serial read, named sensor_buffer. It contains 21 bytes.

gyro_out_X=((sensor_buffer[1]<<8)+sensor_buffer[2]);
gyro_out_Y=((sensor_buffer[3]<<8)+sensor_buffer[4]);
gyro_out_Z=((sensor_buffer[5]<<8)+sensor_buffer[6]);
acc_out_X=((sensor_buffer[7]<<8)+sensor_buffer[8]);
acc_out_Y=((sensor_buffer[9]<<8)+sensor_buffer[10]);
acc_out_Z=((sensor_buffer[11]<<8)+sensor_buffer[12]);
HMC_xo=((sensor_buffer[13]<<8)+sensor_buffer[14]);
HMC_yo=((sensor_buffer[15]<<8)+sensor_buffer[16]);
HMC_zo=((sensor_buffer[17]<<8)+sensor_buffer[18]);
adc_pressure=(((long)sensor_buffer[19]<<16)+(sensor_buffer[20]<<8)+sensor_buffer[21]);

What does this line do:

variable = (array_var<<8) + next_array_var

What effect does it have on the 8 bits?

<<8  ?

UPDATE: Any example in another language (java, processing)?

Example for processing: (why use H like header?).

/*
 * ReceiveBinaryData_P
 *
 * portIndex must be set to the port connected to the Arduino
 */
import processing.serial.*;

Serial myPort;        // Create object from Serial class
short portIndex = 1;  // select the com port, 0 is the first port

char HEADER = 'H';
int value1, value2;         // Data received from the serial port

void setup()
{
  size(600, 600);
  // Open whatever serial port is connected to Arduino.
  String portName = Serial.list()[portIndex];
  println(Serial.list());
  println(" Connecting to -> " + Serial.list()[portIndex]);
  myPort = new Serial(this, portName, 9600);
}

void draw()
{
  // read the header and two binary *(16 bit) integers:
  if ( myPort.available() >= 5)  // If at least 5 bytes are available,
  {
    if( myPort.read() == HEADER) // is this the header
    {
      value1 = myPort.read();                 // read the least significant byte
      value1 =  myPort.read() * 256 + value1; // add the most significant byte

      value2 = myPort.read();                 // read the least significant byte
      value2 =  myPort.read() * 256 + value2; // add the most significant byte

      println("Message received: " + value1 + "," + value2);
    }
  }
  background(255);             // Set background to white
  fill(0);                     // set fill to black
// draw rectangle with coordinates based on the integers received from Arduino
  rect(0, 0, value1,value2);
}
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2  
Which book are you using to learn C++? –  Greg Hewgill Sep 11 '12 at 22:04
1  
That shifts the bits of array_var left by 8 spots (usually for multiplying by 2^8 or masking operations) –  im so confused Sep 11 '12 at 22:06
1  
@Vladislav: he uses 'H' as a header because he feels like it! It's just a signal that the message will contain two coordinates. That's all –  Grim Fandango Sep 11 '12 at 22:46
    
what if I use a program without flag? its just 21-bytes array? –  JohnDow Sep 11 '12 at 22:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your code has the same pattern:

value = (partial_value << 8) | (other_partial_value)

Your array has data stored in 8 bit bytes, but the values are in 16 bit bytes. Each of your data points are two bytes, with the most significant byte stored first in your array. This pattern simply builds the full 16 bit value by shifting the most significant byte 8 bits to the left, then OR'ing the least significant byte into the lower 8 bits.

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Damn! you were faster :-) –  André Oriani Sep 11 '12 at 22:10

Its a shift operator. It shifts the bits in you variable to the left by 8. Shift by 1 bit to the left is equivalent to multiplying by two (shifting to the right divides by 2). So essentially <<8 is equivalent to multiplying by 2^8.

See here for a list of C++ operators and what they do: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B_operators

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thanx! It very useful! –  JohnDow Sep 11 '12 at 22:08

It shifts the bits 8 places to the left, eg:

0000000001000100 << 8 = 0100010000000000

0000000001000100 << 1 = 
0000000010001000 << 1 =
0000000100010000 << 1 =
0000001000100000 << 1 =
0000010001000000 << 1 =
0000100010000000 << 1 =
0001000100000000 << 1 =
0010001000000000 << 1 =
0100010000000000
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<< is the left bit-shift operator, the result is the bits from the first operand moved to the left, with 0 bits filling in from the right.

A simple example in pseudocode:

x = 10000101;
x = x << 3;

now x is "00101000"

Study the Bitwise operation article on wikipedia for an introduction.

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Your example assumes that x only stores 8 bits, and your value is only shifted 2 bits rather than the 3 you intended (you left off the rightmost 0, only displayed 7 bits). –  mah Sep 11 '12 at 22:20
    
@mah thanks, I'd missed a 0. The pseudocode was only meant to provide visualization of a bit-shift. –  pb2q Sep 11 '12 at 22:22

This is just a bit shift operator. If is basically taking the value and shitfing the bits a places to the left. This is equivalent to multiplying the value by 2^8. The code looks like its reading in 2 bytes of the array and creating a 16 bit integer from each pair.

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It seems that sensor_buffer is a matrix of chars. In order to get your value, e.g. gyro_out_X you have to combine sensor_buffer[1] and sensor_buffer[2], where

  • sensor_buffer[1] holds the most significant byte and
  • sensor_buffer[2] holds the least significant byte

in that case

int gyro_out_X=((sensor_buffer[1]<<8)+sensor_buffer[2]);

combines the two bytes:

  • if sensor_buffer[1] is 0xFF
  • and sensor_buffer[2] is 0x10

then gyro_out_X is 0xFF10

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