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I have a program where I have a global char * that I'm going to constantly be changing. Right now, I set it to a value when it's NULL, and alter it when it's not. However, it's never not NULL, even if I'm setting the pointer. An example of what I'm saying:

char *a;

void function()
{
    if(a == NULL)
    {
         a = "Test1";
    }
    else
    {
         a = "Test2";
    }
}

Every time I go through this function, though, a is always null. I assume there's something I need to be doing with memory allocation, but I'm confused about where I would allocate it, and where I would free it. Thanks!

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You're probably storing an older value of a thinking it'll be a reference. Handling the storage for a is the duty of the compiler and you shouldn't worry about it. –  oldrinb Sep 11 '12 at 23:03
1  
PS it works fine for me. –  oldrinb Sep 11 '12 at 23:05
1  
Nothing wrong with this. Look at the other places a is used though. –  weston Sep 11 '12 at 23:06
    
If it's not initialized to NULL then there's no guarantee that it will be NULL when your program starts. It could hold some garbage (non-zero) pointer. –  Oktalist Sep 11 '12 at 23:12
    
@Oktalist: variables at file scope are always initialized, even if they don't have an initializer. –  Steve Jessop Sep 11 '12 at 23:15

3 Answers 3

The first time function() gets called, 'a' will be NULL because global variables in C are initialized to zero.

You then set it to point to "Test1". The second time function() gets called, 'a' will still be a pointer to "Test1", not NULL, so you'll set it to "Test2". Every future call will essentially do nothing, setting 'a' to "Test2" again and again.

If that's not what you're seeing, then there is something different with your actual code compared to the code you posted above. For example, if "char *a" is inside of a function then it is a local variable, not a global, and it will be of undefined value on function entry and also lose its value every time the function exits.

The code below produced the output underneath it, as it should.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

char *a;

void function();

int main( int argc, const char *argv[] )
{
    function();
    function();
    function();
    function();

    return 0;
}


void function()
{
    printf( "function: a=%s", (a ? a : "NULL") );

    if(a == NULL)
    {
         a = "Test1";
    }
    else
    {
         a = "Test2";
    }

    printf( "  exiting a=%s\n", (a ? a : "NULL") );
}


This produces the following output:

function: a=NULL  exiting a=Test1
function: a=Test1  exiting a=Test2
function: a=Test2  exiting a=Test2
function: a=Test2  exiting a=Test2
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I just realized that I'm editing the variable's value in a child process after forking. Could that be the problem? –  Mason Sep 11 '12 at 23:30
1  
I'm not sure exactly what happens in the case of fork-ing. It's been too long. –  EricS Sep 11 '12 at 23:38
    
When you fork a process, the original memory space is copied for the child process. If you change a in the child process, the parent process will not see the change. –  kjw0188 Sep 12 '12 at 0:26

I feel a little sheepish for this. The problem was that I was forking the process, and editing the copy of the variable in the child process, without realizing that the parent process' variable was unaffected.

Sorry about that. Hope this helps someone else who runs into this.

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I'm writing this as a "response" instead of a question so I can format the text better:

Q1) Does the behavior change if you initialize like this?

char *a = NULL;

Q2) what's your compiler, compiler version and OS?

Q3) are you sure there's no other code that might be messing with "a"?

==================================================

ADDENDUM:

Q: I just realized that I'm editing the variable's value in a child process after forking. Could that be the problem? – Mason

A: Only if you expect changing the variable in one process to somehow change the other process (without assigning a shared memory segment) ;)

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@Mason - PS: My experience, as Steve Jessop said, is that "variables at file scope are always initialized". You shouldn't necessarily have to specify char *a = NULL. But I'm curious what happens: please try it. –  paulsm4 Sep 11 '12 at 23:21

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