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In Haskell, I am having some problems defining functions because the types of my argument does not match the required type.

For example, I would like to write a function that takes an n :: Int and produces the list of integers from 1 to the floor of the square root of n. Hence I would to have a function such as:

list :: Int -> [Int]

Originally I defined the function as follows:

list :: Int -> [Int]

list n = [1 .. floor (sqrt n)]

When I loaded the sript, there is an error message of the types not matching. However, I am not sure if I am not matching the type of the sqrt function or the floor function. The error message is the follow:

No instance for (Floating Int)
  arising from a use of 'sqrt' at pe142.hs:6:22-27
Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Floating Int)
In the first argument of 'floor', namely '(sqrt n)'
In the expression: floor (sqrt n)
In the expression: [1 .. floor (sqrt n)]
Failed, modules loaded: none.

Could someone explain to me what is causing the error and how it can be fixed?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

sqrt requires an argument of the Floating class, e.g. a Double. You're passing it an Int, which is not an instance of the Floating class - that's what the error message is telling you.

So to fix the error, convert your Int to a Double before calling sqrt. You can use the fromIntegral function for that.

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When I try this:

list :: Int -> [Int]
list n = [1 .. floor (sqrt n)]

I get this error:

../src/scratch.hs:15:16:
    No instance for (RealFrac Int)
      arising from a use of `floor'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (RealFrac Int)
    In the expression: floor (sqrt n)
    In the expression: [1 .. floor (sqrt n)]
    In an equation for `list': list n = [1 .. floor (sqrt n)]

../src/scratch.hs:15:23:
    No instance for (Floating Int)
      arising from a use of `sqrt'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Floating Int)
    In the first argument of `floor', namely `(sqrt n)'
    In the expression: floor (sqrt n)
    In the expression: [1 .. floor (sqrt n)]

What these errors mean is the following:

  • The floor function can't accept an argument of type Int. Its argument must be of a "real fraction" type. (It doesn't make sense to ask for the floor of numbers whose type only supports whole numbers.)
  • The sqrt function can't accept an argument of type Int either. Its argument must be of a floating point type. (Square roots are usually irrational, so we need a floating point type.)

You'll find that Haskell is very, very picky about what numeric functions can be applied to which numeric types, very picky about what types these functions return, and it performs basically no implicit casting at all. I usually try to let the compiler infer the types in numeric code, because the class hierarchy is really complex. If we leave out the type declaration for your function, the compiler infers this type:

list :: (Floating a, Integral t, RealFrac a) => a -> [t]

I.e., your list function function takes a floating point "real fraction" as its argument, and produces a list of whole numbers as its result. So, for example, list can take an argument of type Double and produce a [Integer].

But even leaving out the type declarations doesn't mean you won't run into trouble, and you often have to use explicit casts; the most typical is you have to use the function fromIntegral to cast integer types to fractional types.

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sqrt has the following type signature:

Floating a => a -> a

This means that sqrt takes a argument of type a and returns an argument of type a. The restiction is that a has to be a type in the type class Floating, usually Single or Double. Int is not in the type class Floating, so you need to convert n to something that is in the type class Floating, you can do this by adding a call to fromIntegral:

list n = [1 .. floor (sqrt (fromIntegral n))]
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This question gets asked about once a week. (That's not a complaint against you, just an observation. Evidently this confuses quite a lot of people.)

In a nutshell, sqrt doesn't work for integers, only for floating-point numbers. (E.g., it doesn't work for Int, but it does work for Double.) In some programming languages, integers are always automatically "promoted" to floating-point numbers in such cases; but in Haskell you must do this manually.

The solution, as half a dozen other people have no doubt already written, is to stick a fromIntegral in there to convert from integers to floating-point. You already have floor in there, which lets you convert back to an integer afterwards, as you'd expect.

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