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I've searched stackoverflow and seen every combination of the words in my question, but not the question I have.

I have an array of ints, it happens to be a 2d array.

const int themap[something][something] = { {0, ...

I have a struct that I want to have a pointer to this array in my program

typedef struct {
int** mymap;
} THE_STRUCT

In my program I want to iterate over the values of the array through the struct's pointer, but my data seems to be corrupted if i try to access it through the . syntax

int value;
THE_STRUCT mystruct;
mystruct = (int**) themap;

...
//access the map data from mystruct's pointer?
value = mystruct.mymap[x][y];
//doesn't seem to return correct values

Taking the struct out of the picture the same exact function works if I directly use the array (as a global variable)

int value;
...
//access the map directly
value = themap[x][y]
//everyone is happy!

I would like to use the struct as in reality it will carry other information as well as the fact that I will need to be able to assign the pointer to other arrays with different data.

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I'm surprised this even compiles. –  netcoder Sep 12 '12 at 0:26
    
stackoverflow.com/a/8203730/900873 –  Kevin Sep 12 '12 at 0:26
    
themap can be interpreted as a pointer, and any pointer-pointer conversions are legal if casted in C. –  nneonneo Sep 12 '12 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your two-dimensional array is not the same as an int **. If you want to store a pointer to it inside the struct, you can do something like:

const int themap[something1][something2] = { {0, ...

typedef struct {
    const int (*mymap)[something2];
} THE_STRUCT;

...

THE_STRUCT my_struct;
my_struct.mymap = themap;

...

int value = my_struct.mymap[x][y];

It is possible to use an int **, but it requires some effort:

const int themap[something1][something2] = { {0, ...
const int * themapPointerArray[something1] = {themap[0], themap[1], ..., themap[something1 - 1]};

typedef struct {
    const int **mymap;
} THE_STRUCT;

...

THE_STRUCT my_struct;
my_struct.mymap = themapPointerArray;

...

int value = my_struct.mymap[x][y];
share|improve this answer
    
what if I don't want to hard code the array length 'something2' in the struct as it might be different? –  ammianus Sep 12 '12 at 0:31
    
Then you should linearize the array -- const int themapLinear[something1 * something2] = {0, ...} so that you only need to store a const int *. You would then replace themap[x][y] with themapLinear[(x * something2) + y] and here something2 doesn't need to be known until runtime (and can, e.g., be passed into a function). –  Joshua Green Sep 12 '12 at 0:39
    
The problem is that interpreting something like themap[x][y], if themap is a two-dimensional array, requires knowing how many elements are in each row. The compiler will need to know that at compile time. –  Joshua Green Sep 12 '12 at 0:48
    
It is possible to use an int ** and I've updated my answer accordingly. –  Joshua Green Sep 12 '12 at 1:04
1  
Ah, good. The const tells the compiler that you won't modify the values and that it can assume that to be the case. It will warn you if you try. There are ways around this, but it's still good to declare arrays of and pointers to const data if you have no need to modify the stored data, as it helps prevent bugs and makes it easier for different pieces of code to use the same array(s). –  Joshua Green Sep 23 '12 at 21:30

A multidimensional array int [][] and a double-indirect pointer int ** are two completely different things.

A multidimensional array is, to C, a one-dimensional array indexed in a different way. Say x is int [3][4]. Then, x contains 12 sequentially-packed elements, and x[1][2] is just the 6th element of that one-dimensional array.

A double-indirect pointer treated as a 2-dimensional array is an array of pointers to arrays. So, if y is int **, then y[1][2] means "the third element of the array pointed to by the second element of y".

You cannot therefore convert between int [][] and int **, since they just represent different things (your casting of int [][] to int ** causes the integers in the int [][] array to be treated as pointers, which will inevitably crash).

Instead, you can cast int [M][N] as int (*)[N] -- a pointer to an array of N-length arrays.

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