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I'm messing around trying to learn C# in Visual Studio. I have only basic coding knowledge, and I bought C# 5.0 in a nutshell. I'm loving the book, and trying to make mini programs out of everything I read to help make it stick. I thought structs were something simple, but for whatever reason I just can't get a struct to work.

So here's a brief and ultra basic example from the book.

    public struct Point
    {
        int x, y;
        public Point(int x, int y) { this.x = x; this.y = y; }
    }
    Point p1 = new Point();
    Point p2 = new Point(1, 1);

It works fine. But now say I want to manipulate the x and y variables in p1 or p2. I've tried so much, and I can't get it to work.

    public struct Point
    {
        public int x;
    }
    Point p1 = new Point();
    p1.x = 10;

This won't work. When I try to set p1.x to 10, I get an error. It says p1 is a "field" but is used like a "type."

There's probably something simple I'm missing, but my patience for trial and error has run out. So what am I doing wrong? I understand the basic concept of why a struct is useful, but I need to be able to actually use it once I make it!

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6  
You need to put the code inside a function/method. The type and member variable declarations can be in an enclosing type, but the statement p1.x = 10 must be in a function/method. Alternatively, you can initialize it as: Point p1 = new Point() { x = 10; }; (this is still part of the declaration bit). –  user166390 Sep 12 '12 at 0:44
1  
As a side note, see stackoverflow.com/questions/441309/why-are-mutable-structs-evil –  Tim S. Sep 12 '12 at 2:23
    
Struct property setters are problematic. The proper solution, however, is not to limit struct mutation to replacement, but rather to simply expose public fields, especially if the purpose of a struct is simply to hold a number of related variables, rather than encapsulate functionality. Note that there isn't really any such thing as a non-trivial "immutable" structure type. Immutability is a property of structure instances. –  supercat Sep 13 '12 at 19:34
    
So-called "immutable" structures don't allow mutation except by doing a memberwise copy of another struct instance. A statement myPoint = new Point(5); doesn't replace myPoint with a new instance. It generates a new temporary instance, initializes it, and then overwrites all fields (public and private) in myPoint with the corresponding values in the temporary point, which is then discarded. If myPoint is writable, all of its fields may be mutated via such assignment. If it isn't writable, none of its fields may be mutated via any means whatsoever. –  supercat Sep 13 '12 at 19:41

2 Answers 2

    class Program
    {
        public struct Point
        {
            int x, y;
            public Point(int x, int y) { this.x = x; this.y = y; }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Point p1 = new Point();
            Point p2 = new Point(1, 1);
        }
    }

Just like @pst mentioned. p1 and p2 need to be inside a method. In this case they are inside the main method.

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Tono Nam's answer is correct but incomplete.

To set the values of x and y the way you want to, you will also need to set the correct access modifier for x and y e.g.

class Program
{
    public struct Point
    {
        public int x, y;
        public Point(int x, int y) { this.x = x; this.y = y; }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var p1 = new Point();
        var p2 = new Point(1, 1);
        p1.x = 1;
        p1.y = 1;
    }
}

You'll want to use public to access x and y from any class.

You'll want to use internal if you only want to access x and y from within the same class where the struct Point is defined.

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