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I'm just beginning to explore the use of packages. I would like the result of a function (as a variable "myXML") to be available to other elements of the code. And I'm wondering if creating a new class file is the way to go. For example:

package  
{
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.Event;
    import flash.net.URLLoader;
    import flash.net.URLRequest;    

    public class XMLLoad 
    {
        public var myXML:XML;
        public var myLoader:URLLoader = new URLLoader();
        myLoader.load(new URLRequest("http://myWebsite/myFile.xml"));
        myLoader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, processXML);

        public function processXML(e:Event):void 
        {
            myXML = new XML(e.target.data);
            trace(myXML);
        }

    }

}

Is this a good way to create a global variable? If so, in the FLA file, how would I access/use the var "myXM" which holds the XML data?

import XMLLoad;
XMLLoad();
?

Many thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you've done in your class is almost there, but there are a few things that need to be rectified:

Firstly, within the top level of a class deceleration you are only allowed to define members (properties and methods). At the moment you're doing that which is great, but you're also attempting to run some actual code in this scope as well:

myLoader.load(new URLRequest("http://myWebsite/myFile.xml"));
myLoader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, processXML);

This will throw and error and your class will not function. To run code immediately when an instance of a class is created, you will need to use a constructor, which is a function using the same name as the class it's declared within (this is case sensitive). Converting that into code will look like this, where you'll notice I've created the constructor and placed the culprit code inside of it:

public class XMLLoad 
{

    public var myXML:XML;
    public var myLoader:URLLoader = new URLLoader();


    // This is the constructor.
    public function XMLLoad()
    {
        myLoader.load(new URLRequest("http://myWebsite/myFile.xml"));
        myLoader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, processXML);
    }


    public function processXML(e:Event):void 
    {
        myXML = new XML(e.target.data);
        trace(myXML);
    }

}

What you've done now is created a class XMLLoad. Using the new keyword, you are able to create instances of that class. In your case, you will only need a single instance to do what you want, like this:

var xmlLoad:XMLLoad = new XMLLoad();

This will created an instance of XMLLoad and assigned it to the variable xmlLoad, through which you will be able to access properties and methods that you defined in that class. The constructor we created above will also run automatically, meaning your class has already initiated a request for some XML.

Unfortunately because requests for external data are asynchronous (that is, they perform on a timeline which is different to the natural flow of your application), we are unable to tell when the XML has completely loaded and we are able to use it from outside the class. What we can do however is change the XMLLoad class a little bit to help us out:

public class XMLLoad 
{

    public var myXML:XML;
    public var myLoader:URLLoader = new URLLoader();
    private var _callback:Function;

    public function XMLLoad(callback:Function)
    {
        _callback = callback;
        myLoader.load(new URLRequest("http://myWebsite/myFile.xml"));
        myLoader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, processXML);
    }

    public function processXML(e:Event):void 
    {
        myXML = new XML(e.target.data);
        _callback(myXML);
    }

}

What we've done here is modify the constructor to accept a reference to a function, which should accept an argument of the type XML. Then we've modified your processXML function to perform the callback and send the received XML through to it. This means that you can now do this:

var xmlLoad:XMLLoad = new XMLLoad(done);

function done(xml:XML):void
{
    trace(xml);
}

This means that you will be able to continue your application within the done function, which will have the fully loaded XML available to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thank you @marty. Great contribution. I have been struggling with this for a while. All of the data I will pull into my application is held in the XML. So being able to have access it globally will make it much easier. At the moment I have the rest of the coding inside the XML Process function. I'm going to print this out and go through it in detail. –  Stephen Sep 15 '12 at 3:24

Marty Wallace's answer covers everything you need to know to get your question answered and working. I would add, though, that since you are trying to make these variables Global, there is one dangerous pitfall.

The danger is that every time you call new, you get a new instance of your variables. It can be very easy to accidentally create two or more sets of Globals, each with different values.

There are two solutions: using only static variables, or writing the class as a singleton.

The first is much simpler, just add the static keyword to your variables and remember to reference them with XMLLoad.variable_name instead of creating a new instance.

public class XMLLoad {
    public static var myXML:XML;
    public static var myLoader:URLLoader = new URLLoader();
    private static var _callback:Function;

    public static function loadXML(callback:Function):void
    {
        _callback = callback;
        myLoader.load(new URLRequest("http://myWebsite/myFile.xml"));
        myLoader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, processXML);
    }

    public function processXML(e:Event):void 
    {
        myXML = new XML(e.target.data);
        _callback(myXML);
    }
}

Then, to once again borrow from Marty:

XMLLoad.loadXML(done);

function done(xml:XML):void {
    trace(xml);
}

This is nice, but in more complex situations get a little wordy and confusing. Singletons, on the other hand, work the same way, but behave just like a normal class. Though the inner workings can be a little more complex.

public class XMLLoad {
    /**
     *  A static variable that holds the actual instance of the class.
     **/
    private static var instance:XMLLoad;

    public var myXML:XML;

    /**
     *  An initialization method that replaces the constructor and creates
     *      (if it didn't already exists) and returns the instance for external
     *      use.
     **/
    public static function GetLoader():XMLLoad {
        if (!instance) {
            instance = new XMLLoad;
        }
        return instance;
    }

    public function loadXML(callback:Function):void {
        _callback = callback;
        myLoader.load(new URLRequest("http://myWebsite/myFile.xml"));
        myLoader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, processXML);
    }

    private function processXML(e:Event):void {
        myXML = new XML(e.target.data);
        _callback(myXML);
    }
}

The call to this class would look like this:

var xmlLoader:XMLLoad = XMLLoad.GetLoader();
xmlLoader.loadXML(done);

function done(xml:XML):void {
    trace(xml);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good point @jeremy and thanks for the clear explanation. I think the 'static' may be the way to go with this and I'll incorporate and test that out. –  Stephen Sep 15 '12 at 3:28
  1. Create a class called "Variables.as"

  2. The code inside it is like so (note: no functions, just variables):

    // Define these variables in the normal place where you would 
    // define them in an AS3 class/package
    
    public static var enabled:Boolean = false;
    public static var configXMLData:XML;
    
  3. Usage, import Variables.as and just call and set using Variables.enable = true or trace(Variables.enable) etc. Add to public static var list for the variables you want.

  4. XML Loading can be done in an external class or in your main application. Sounds like you don't know much about AS3 (no offence) so I would just keep it simple for now and stick it in your main class. All code assists are in Adobe Live Docs (some keywords there for you when Googling) eg. AS3 LoadXML googles will give you lots of examples. Note setup, load, load complete, get data is the process flow you want. So you only proceed with your application once the onComplete function is called.

  5. Once your XML is loaded Google up AS3 E4X parsing. This is a huge subject where you can retrieve the value of attributes and node content using XML E4X for AS3. It's not hard you will need examples to reference to. There is also the old way which is XML List, which you can find documented and exampled Adobe Live Docs xmlList. Once you know enough about this you will be able to set the Variables in the Class document Variables.as at will. And no matter where you need them you simply call Variables.enable for example in any class you want.

share|improve this answer
    
that helps a lot; thank you @Darcey –  Stephen Sep 12 '12 at 1:37

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