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As a C# developer I'm used to the following style of exception handling:

try
{
    throw SomeException("hahahaha!");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Log(ex.ToString());
}

Output
------

SomeNamespace.SomeException: hahahaha!
    at ConsoleApplication1.Main() in ConsoleApplication1\Program.cs:line 27

Its really simple, and yet tells me everything I need to know about what the exception was and where it was.

How do I achieve the equivalent thing in JavaScript where the exception object itself might just be a string. I really want to be able to know the exact line of code where the exception happened, however the following code doesn't log anything useful at all:

try
{
    var WshShell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
    return WshShell.RegRead("HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\Some\\Invalid\\Location");
}
catch (ex)
{
    Log("Caught exception: " + ex);
}

Output
------

Caught exception: [object Error]

EDIT (again): Just to clarify, this is for internal application that makes heavy use of JavaScript. I'm after a way of extracting useful information from JavaScript errors that may be caught in the production system - I already have a logging mechanism, just want a way of getting a sensible string to log.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use almost in the same manner ie.

try
{
    throw new Error("hahahaha!");
}
catch (e)
{
    alert(e.message)
}

But if you want to get line number and filename where error is thrown i suppose there is no crossbrowser solution. Message and name are the only standart properties of Error object. In mozilla you have also lineNumber and fileName properties.

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I'm not sure whether or not it is cross browser or if it's what you are looking for, but I suggest you try:

window.onerror = function (err, file, line) {
    logError('The following error occurred: ' + 
    err + '\nIn file: ' + file + '\nOn line: ' + line);
    return true;
}
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I know I'm 4 years late to the party here, but still felt the urge to add my 2 cents.

As Eldar points out, you can use e.message to get the message of the exception. However, in Chrome, Firefox and IE10+, you can also get the stack trace using e.stack. The stack trace will include the file and line number of the exception.

So to assemble a string with exception info, you would write something like this:

var exmsg = "";
if (e.message) {
    exmsg += e.message;
}
if (e.stack) {
    exmsg += ' | stack: ' + e.stack;
}

Note that you will only get a stack trace if

  1. the exception was thrown by the browser (such as in response to a syntax error);
  2. the exception object is an Error object or has the Error object as its prototype.

So just throwing a string (throw 'Exception!!') won't give you a stack trace.

To take this a bit further, to catch all uncaught exceptions, you would use a window.onerror handler (similar to .Net Application_Error handler in global.asax). The drawback of this used to be (and mostly still is) that this wouldn't give you access to the actual exception object, so you couldn't get the stack trace. You'd only get the message, url and line number.

Recently, the standard has been extended to give you the column (great for minified files) and the exception object as well: http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/webappapis.html#errorevent

Right now (April 2014), only Chrome 32 implements all this. IE10+ gives you the column but not the exception object. Firefox 28 still only gives you message, url and line number. Hopefully, this will improve soon. I've written about this for the JSNLog project, at: http://jsnlog.com/Documentation/GetStartedLogging/ExceptionLogging

(disclaimer: I am the author of JSNLog and jsnlog.com)

Secondly, the .Net Exception object supports inner exceptions. It also has a Data property so you can attach key value pairs with for example variable values. I sort of missed that in JavaScript Error object, so I created my own Exception object, also as part of the JSNLog project. It is in the jsnlog.js file in the jsnlog.js Github project (https://github.com/mperdeck/jsnlog.js).

Description is at: http://jsnlog.com/Documentation/JSNLogJs/Exception

Finally a shameless plug - the JSNLog project I'm working on lets you insert loggers in your JavaScript, and automatically inserts the log messages in your existing server side log. So to log JavaScript exceptions with their stack traces to your server side log, you only need to write:

try {
    ...
} catch (e) {
    JL().fatalException("something went wrong!", e);
}
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It is almost identical, see the manual: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Guide/Exception_Handling_Statements/try...catch_Statement

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I'm really interested in knowing how to extact useful information from the exception - I've rephrased my question. –  Justin Aug 6 '09 at 10:30

You can use logging tools like Yahoo! UI Library - Logger to log the errors/informative messages.

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If you just want to see the Exception in the browser's log, I think you just have to throw the Exception respectively remove the try-catch.

try {
    throw new Error("Exception");
} catch (e) {
    throw e;
}

or

//try {
    throw new Error("Exception");
//} catch (e) {
//    throw e;
//}

than the Exception is throw automatically in the console.

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