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I have a string that has both binary and string characters and I would like to convert it to binary first, then to hex.

The string is as below:

<81>^Q<81>"^Q^@^[)^G ^Q^A^S^A^V^@<83>^Cd<80><99>}^@N^@^@^A^@^@^@^@^@^@^@j

How do I go about converting this string in Python so that the output in hex format is similar to this below?

24208040901811001B12050809081223431235113245422F0A23000000000000000000001F
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5  
can you elaborate on the intended translation? It appears to me that the example string and the hex output are not the same thing... is <81> a single, not-printable hexadecimally encoded character or is it a textual representation of this? I'm confused by the string holding binary charaters (what do you mean by that) and that hou want to convert it to binary, then to hex... –  Adriaan Aug 6 '09 at 10:08
    
Do this: print(repr(your_string))) and copy/paste the result into your question. Tell us what version of Python and what platform. –  John Machin Aug 6 '09 at 14:16
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3 Answers

You can use ord and hex like this :

>>> s = 'some string'
>>> hex_chars = map(hex,map(ord,s))
>>> print hex_chars
['0x73', '0x6f', '0x6d', '0x65', '0x20', '0x73', '0x74', '0x72', '0x69', '0x6e', '0x67']
>>> hex_string = "".join(c[2:4] for c in hex_chars)
>>> print hex_string
736f6d6520737472696e67
>>>

Or use the builtin encoding :

>>> s = 'some string'
>>> print s.encode('hex_codec')
736f6d6520737472696e67
>>>
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1  
Your version with hex and ord does not work reliably. Use "%2.2x".__mod__ instead of hex and you can also avoid the c[2:4]. As a result it would look like: "".join(map("%2.2x".__mod__, map(ord, s))). The encoding version is of course better. :-) –  Helmut Grohne Feb 21 '11 at 13:19
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>>> import binascii

>>> s = '2F'

>>> hex_str = binascii.b2a_hex(s)

>>> hex_str

>>> '3246'

OR

>>>import binascii

>>> hex_str = binascii.hexlify(s)

>>> hex_str
>>> '3246'
>>>
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Faster solution see:

from timeit import Timer

import os
import binascii

def testSpeed(statement, setup = 'pass'):
  print '%s' % statement
  print '%s' % Timer(statement, setup).timeit()

setup = """
import os

value = os.urandom(32)
"""

# winner
statement = """
import binascii

binascii.hexlify(value)
"""

testSpeed(statement, setup)

# loser
statement = """
import binascii

value.encode('hex_codec')
"""

testSpeed(statement, setup)

Results:

import binascii

binascii.hexlify(value)

2.18547999816

value.encode('hex_codec')

2.91231595077
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