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Today I want to test these two parameters "profile" and "slowms". the following is my cases:

profile is 1 and slowms is 200

  1. >./mongod --dbpath /data/db --fork --profile 1 --slowms 200
  2. do a query and this query costed 415ms
  3. log file has the related operation message,system.profile also has the related document
  4. do a query again and this query costed 110ms
  5. log file don't have the related operation message,system.profile don't have the related document

update these two parameters "profile" and "slowms"

profile is 2 and slowms is 200

  1. >./mongod --dbpath /data/db --fork --profile 2 --slowms 200
  2. do a query and this query costed 410ms
  3. log file has the related operation message,system.profile also has the related document
  4. do a query again and this query costed 100ms
  5. log file don't have the related operation message,system.profile don't have the related document

when the parameter "profile" is 2, why the log file and system.profile don't have the related information? Thanks!

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Can you include an example of the query in your question, as well as how you are checking for this query in the system.profile collection for your second case? Also, which specific version of MongoDB are you using? –  Stennie Sep 12 '12 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

All slow queries are written to the mongod log. The default slowms value is 100ms.

The MongoDB profiling levels enable writing additional information to the system.profile capped collection for a database.

The profiling levels are:

0 - off
1 - write slow operations 
    to the system.profile collection
2 - write all operations to the system.profile collection

If you pass the profiling levels as command line or config file arguments, they affect the defaults for all databases. You can also use db.setProfilingLevel(..) and db.getProfilingLevel(..) within the mongo shell to set or get the profiling level per database.

So for your first test:

  1. ./mongod --dbpath /data/db --fork --profile 1 --slowms 200
  2. do a query and this query costed 415ms
  3. log file has the related operation message,system.profile also has the related document
  4. do a query again and this query costed 110ms
  5. log file don't have the related operation message,system.profile don't have the related document update because you have

This is the expected outcome with your profiling set to 1 and with slowms of 200ms:

  • your slow query (415ms > 200ms) is being logged to the system.profile as well as the log file
  • the second query (110ms < 200ms) is not considered a slow query so is not logged or saved in system.profile

For your second test:

  1. >./mongod --dbpath /data/db --fork --profile 2 --slowms 200
  2. do a query and this query costed 410ms
  3. log file has the related operation message,system.profile also has the related document
  4. do a query again and this query costed 100ms
  5. log file don't have the related operation message,system.profile don't have the related document

    • your slow query is being logged to both
    • the second query isn't slow, but will be still logged to the system.profile as profiling level 2

Note that with the profiling level of 2, you will collect many more entries in your system.profile. The default order of a find() will be from oldest to newest, so if you want to see the latest query for a given collection you need to sort in reverse natural order.

For example, to find the last query for the people collection in the test database, you could search on the test.people namespace similar to:

db.system.profile.find({'ns':'test.people'}).sort({$natural:-1}).limit(1)
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Hi,Stennie, this testing is done in my computer,and have no other operations. –  Steve Sep 12 '12 at 15:04

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