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I am making a linux module that makes an acpi call every second (currently only for 20 seconds). I would like for it to continue making the acpi call every second until it is removed. As I have it I put the module into a loop and if I do indeed set this loop repeating forever I cannot use rmmod to remove the module. Is there a way I could set a global variable for the loop?

Code: acpi_call.ko

/* Copyright (c) 2010: Michal Kottman */
#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/proc_fs.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <asm/uaccess.h>
#include <acpi/acpi.h>
#include <linux/jiffies.h>
#include <linux/sched.h>

MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");

#define BUFFER_SIZE 256

extern struct proc_dir_entry *acpi_root_dir;
char result_buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
void do_acpi_call(void);

size_t get_avail_bytes(void) 
{
    return BUFFER_SIZE - strlen(result_buffer);
}

char *get_buffer_end(void) 
{
    return result_buffer + strlen(result_buffer);
}

int __init init_battcheck(void) 
{
    int i;
    if( true )
    {
        for (i=0 ; i < 1 ; i++) 
        {
            do_acpi_call();
            if(result_buffer[3] == '1')
                printk(KERN_INFO "Battery is discharging. %c\n", result_buffer[3]);
            else if(result_buffer[3] == '2')
                printk(KERN_INFO "Battery is charging. %c\n", result_buffer[3]);
            else
                printk(KERN_INFO "Battery is CRITICAL. %c\n", result_buffer[3]);
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

/** Appends the contents of an acpi_object to the result buffer
@param result: An acpi object holding result data
@returns: 0 if the result could fully be saved, a higher value otherwise **/
int acpi_result_to_string(union acpi_object *result) 
{
    if (result->type == ACPI_TYPE_INTEGER) 
    {
        snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(),"0x%x", (int)result->integer.value);
    } 
    else if (result->type == ACPI_TYPE_STRING) 
    {
        snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(), "\"%*s\"", result->string.length, result->string.pointer);
    } 
    else if (result->type == ACPI_TYPE_BUFFER) 
    {
        int i;
        // do not store more than data if it does not fit. The first element is
        // just 4 chars, but there is also two bytes from the curly brackets
        int show_values = min(result->buffer.length, get_avail_bytes() / 6);

        sprintf(get_buffer_end(), "{");
        for (i = 0; i < show_values; i++)
            sprintf(get_buffer_end(), i == 0 ? "0x%02x" : ", 0x%02x", result->buffer.pointer[i]);

        if (result->buffer.length > show_values)
        {
            // if data was truncated, show a trailing comma if there is space
            snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(), ",");
            return 1;
        } 
        else 
        {
            // in case show_values == 0, but the buffer is too small to hold
            // more values (i.e. the buffer cannot have anything more than "{")
            snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(), "}");
        }
    } 
    else if (result->type == ACPI_TYPE_PACKAGE) 
    {
        int i;
        sprintf(get_buffer_end(), "[");
        for (i=0; i < result->package.count; i++) 
        {
            if (i > 0)
                snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(), ", ");

            // abort if there is no more space available
            if (!get_avail_bytes() || acpi_result_to_string(&result->package.elements[i]))
                return 1;
        }
        snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(), "]");
    } 
    else 
    {
        snprintf(get_buffer_end(), get_avail_bytes(), "Object type 0x%x\n", result->type);
    }

    // return 0 if there are still bytes available, 1 otherwise
    return !get_avail_bytes();
}


void do_acpi_call(void)
{
    acpi_status status;
    acpi_handle handle;
    struct acpi_object_list arg;
    struct acpi_buffer buffer = { ACPI_ALLOCATE_BUFFER, NULL };

    printk(KERN_INFO "acpi_call: Calling \\_SB.PCI0.LPCB.EC0.BAT0._BST\n");

    // get the handle of the method, must be a fully qualified path
    status = acpi_get_handle(NULL, (acpi_string) "\\_SB.PCI0.LPCB.EC0.BAT0._BST", &handle);

    if (ACPI_FAILURE(status)) 
    {
        snprintf(result_buffer, BUFFER_SIZE, "Error: %s", acpi_format_exception(status));
        printk(KERN_ERR "acpi_call: Cannot get handle: %s\n", result_buffer);
        return;
    }

    // prepare parameters
    arg.count = 0;
    arg.pointer = NULL;

    // call the method
    status = acpi_evaluate_object(handle, NULL, &arg, &buffer);
    if (ACPI_FAILURE(status)) 
    {
        snprintf(result_buffer, BUFFER_SIZE,"Error: %s", acpi_format_exception(status));
        printk(KERN_ERR "acpi_call: Method call failed: %s\n", result_buffer);
        return;
    }

    // reset the result buffer
    *result_buffer = '\0';
    acpi_result_to_string(buffer.pointer);
    kfree(buffer.pointer);

    printk(KERN_INFO "acpi_call: Call successful: %s\n", result_buffer);
}


/** module initialization function */
int __init init_acpi_call(void) 
{
    struct proc_dir_entry *acpi_entry = create_proc_entry("call", 0660, acpi_root_dir);

    strcpy(result_buffer, "not called");

    if (acpi_entry == NULL) 
    {
        printk(KERN_ERR "acpi_call: Couldn't create proc entry\n");
        return -ENOMEM;
    }

    printk(KERN_INFO "acpi_call: Module loaded successfully\n");

    init_battcheck();

    return 0;
}

void __exit unload_acpi_call(void) 
{
    remove_proc_entry("call", acpi_root_dir);
    printk(KERN_INFO "acpi_call: Module unloaded successfully\n");
}

module_init(init_acpi_call);
module_exit(unload_acpi_call);

EDIT: I just realized I do not have this waiting a second at every call to do_acpi_call, I had it do this just to bug check. This is just an example of what I am making. I am asking if there is a way to make it so I can remove a module that is in a loop as I described?

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1  
Please note: it is counterproductive to check the battery every second, since 1) it doesn't change (an interesting amount) that fast and 2) running all those checks will drain the battery faster than if you did it less often, say every minute. –  Alex Brown Sep 12 '12 at 3:49
    
noted, thank you. –  user1311286 Sep 12 '12 at 3:55

1 Answer 1

Set up and make use of a workqueue. This will schedule the work you want to be run for some time in the future. Read about it in Linux Device Drivers: http://lwn.net/images/pdf/LDD3/ch07.pdf

When asynchronous tasks start to fly around your kernel module, you need to be insanely careful about avoiding race conditions and carefully cleaning things up. That is, on module removal, cancel any outstanding work, wait for any in-progress jobs to finish (being sure that job doesn't reschedule itself), then destroy the workqueue, and only then close any resources that the work function might want to use.

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