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I would like to clean up my login script and help make it safe for my database. I am a basic coder and learned what I have from tutorials, so I guess my script needs some protections, any suggestions?

<?php

session_start();

$email = strtolower( trim($_POST['email']));
$pass = $_POST['password'];

if ($email&&$pass){

require_once("dbconnect.php");

$query = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM users WHERE username='$email'");
$numrows = mysql_num_rows($query);
if ($numrows!=0){   
//code to login
    while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($query)){
        $dbusername = $row['username'];        //USERNAME IS NAME OF COLUMN IN DB
        $dbpassword = $row['password'];
        $activated = $row['activated'];

        if ($activated=='0')
            die("Your account has not been activated.(Remember to check in your email spam folder)");
    }

    //check to see if they match
    if ($email==$dbusername&&md5($pass)==$dbpassword){
        //echo "You have succesfully logged-in! <a href='start.php'>Click</a> here to enter." ;
        $_SESSION['username']=$email;
        header( 'Location: http://website' ) ;
    }
    else{
        echo "The password you entered is incorrect";   
    }
}
else
    die("Sorry, the email you have entered is incorrect");

}

else
    die("Please enter your email and password");


?>
share|improve this question
3  
This type of code review question is better suited to... Code Review. –  minitech Sep 12 '12 at 3:51
1  
md5 is not a secure hashing algorithm. I suggest PHP's crypt function for password hashing. It makes the whole process much easier than other methods. –  G-Nugget Sep 12 '12 at 3:51
3  
Anyway, use prepared statements PDO instead of mysql_ to protect against SQL injection and to just generally make things more convenient and neater; use bcrypt or scrypt for hashing passwords; put spaces around your operators. –  minitech Sep 12 '12 at 3:52
2  
@zerkms I can't argue that crypt() is easier to use than md5 () as it is used here, but this implementation is not secure. crypt() puts the hash, salt, difficulty, and algorithm in one string, allowing a password to be verified in one easy line instead of having to build the whole process by getting the hash and salt separately and it allows different algorithms and difficulties to be used simultaneously with the same code. –  G-Nugget Sep 12 '12 at 3:58
1  
@zerkms So I should have said that it's easier than other secure methods, but crypt can be used like crypt('pass'), although with much weaker security. –  G-Nugget Sep 12 '12 at 4:02
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closed as off topic by todofixthis, ЯegDwight, Boldewyn, nbrooks, Tom Redfern Sep 12 '12 at 12:33

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2 Answers

Look, I rewrote it for you! This uses PDO and prepared statements, which patches the SQL injection vulnerability in the most elegant way possible (i.e. not mysql_real_escape_string), and also uses bcrypt for hashing passwords, which is infinitely better than one MD5 with no salt.

<?php
session_start();

if(isset($_POST['email']) && isset($_POST['password'])) {
    require_once 'dbconnect.php';

    $email = strtolower(trim($_POST['email']));
    $password = $_POST['password'];

    $query = $link->prepare('SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = :email LIMIT 1');
    $query->execute(array(':email' => $email));
    $row = $query->fetch();

    if($row) {
        if(!$row->activated) {
            die('Your account has not been activated. (Remember to check in your e-mail spam folder!)');
        }

        if($row->username === $email && crypt($password, $row->password) === $row->password) {
            $_SESSION['username'] = $email;
            header('Location: http://website'); # If this isn't a relative URL, try using one.
            exit();
        }
    }

    die('Invalid e-mail and/or password. Please try again.');
}
?>

You'll need to make a couple changes to your database, to your registration code, and to your database connection code, however.

share|improve this answer
    
this looks great, can anyone second that this is the code to use? –  user1664386 Sep 12 '12 at 4:13
    
wait what changes to database must i make? –  user1664386 Sep 12 '12 at 4:13
    
@user1664386: Well, you'll need to change the size of the password field to 61 to accommodate the different hashing algorithm. And that's pretty much it. –  minitech Sep 12 '12 at 4:16
2  
Tiny note: isset accepts N parameters: isset($a, $b) and it's eq to isset($a) && isset($b) –  zerkms Sep 12 '12 at 4:42
1  
@zerkms: It is, but the salt is included in the hash, and the actual hash is ignored when it's passed as a salt. –  minitech Sep 12 '12 at 5:00
show 6 more comments

First, I would fix the SQL injection vulnerability by changing:

$email = strtolower( trim($_POST['email']));
$pass = $_POST['password'];

if ($email&&$pass){

    require_once("dbconnect.php");

to

require_once("dbconnect.php");

$email = mysql_real_escape_string(strtolower( trim($_POST['email'])));
$pass = $_POST['password'];

if ($email&&$pass){

The next thing you could do is prevent against "session hijacking" by changing

if ($email==$dbusername&&md5($pass)==$dbpassword){
    //echo "You have succesfully logged-in! <a href='start.php'>Click</a> here to enter." ;
    $_SESSION['username']=$email;

to

if ($email==$dbusername&&md5($pass)==$dbpassword){
    //echo "You have succesfully logged-in! <a href='start.php'>Click</a> here to enter." ;
    session_regenerate_id();
    $_SESSION['username']=$email;

I am not sure where this login script is being used (internally or externally) but if its used externally, you could add the users ip address as a session variable and check that everytime a user returns. I would also use the crypt() function instead of md5() because md5() is NOT recommended for hashing passwords (this might depend on how many users you have and if you want to reset everyones password). I use the PHPass class Besides security, you could be using MySQLi (aka MySQL improved) instead of the original MySQL code because it is being deprecated. But changing to MySQLi depends on if your PHP supports MySQLi.

share|improve this answer
    
The password should not be escaped since it is getting hashed. technically you could escape it as long as you make sure it's always escaped, but it's easier to leave it unescaped everywhere since it never really goes to the database. –  G-Nugget Sep 12 '12 at 4:11
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