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I am writing a program in MATLAB (must use MATLAB and can't really use a MEX) to filter very large amounts of data.

One of the filters I need to implement requires me to compare a timestamp vector versus a list of known "bad" times around which other timestamps cannot occur.

A typical timestamp vector has about 2,000,000 entries, and I have a list of about 300,000 "bad times."

Here's an working example, if TIME=[1, 2.3, 5.5, 9.1, 10];, and BAD_TIMES=[5.2, 9.3];, and we have a tolerance tolerance=0.25;, then all timestamps in TIME between 4.95 and 5.45 and 9.05 and 9.55 must be erased. This means that the cleaned vector TIME_CLEAN should be equal to TIME_CLEAN=[1, 2.3, 5.5, 10];.

This problem is straightforward to solve, and I have solved it in about 4 or 5 different ways. However, for a 1,000,000 timestamp job, this problem can easily take an hour to compute.

I am looking to solve this type of problem in under 2 minutes on a typical Core-i7 workstation for this filter to be viable with this many time entries.

I have included a working version of this code. I understand code vectorization and functions such as bsxfun() can help, but the improvement is marginal relative to the type of efficiency I require for this filter.

Are there any very clever ways to solve this problem in a very efficient fashion? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

P.S. The code below is complete; it generates all data needed to setup the problem and solves it (although VERY slowly!). Change the NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS variable to something larger (such as 1,000,000) to watch it crawl!

clear all %% CLEAR WORKSPACE
close all %% CLOSE FIGURES
clc %% CLEAR COMMAND WINDOW

NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS=10000; %% NUMBER OF TIMESTAMPS IN ORIGINAL DATA

TOLERANCE=2; %% TOLERANCE AROUND TIMESTAMP

A=sort(randi(NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS/10,NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS,1)); %% GENERATE ARTIFICIAL TIMESTAMPS

B=unique(sort(round(randi([NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS/2,NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS*5],[NO_OF_TIMESTAMPS/10,1])/10))); %% GENERATE ARTIFICIAL LIST OF BAD TIMESTAMPS

B_LB=B-TOLERANCE; %% CREATE A LIST OF LOWERBOUND BAD TIMESTAMPS
B_UB=B+TOLERANCE; %% CREATE A LIST OF UPPERBPUND BAD TIMESTAMPS
B_RANGE=[B_LB B_UB]; %% AUGMENTED MATRIX COMPOSED OF VECTORS B_LB and B_UB

A_ROWS=size(A,1); %% SIZE OF A;

B_ROWS=size(B,1); %% SIZE OF B;

tic; %% START TIMER

A_TO_CLEAN=ones(A_ROWS,1); %% BOOLEAN VECTOR TO BE USED IN FILTERING
for ii=1:A_ROWS

    for jj=1:B_ROWS

        if A(ii)>=B_RANGE(jj,1) && A(ii)<=B_RANGE(jj,2) %% CHECK EACH MEMBER OF A VERSUS EACH MEMBER OF B_RANGE

           A_TO_CLEAN(ii)=0; %% SET INDEX VECTOR A_TO_CLEAN = 0 SO THAT WE CAN DELETE LATER

           break; %% A(ii) CAN ONLY BE ERASED ONCE, SO BREAK jj LOOP AND GO TO NEXT ii

        end

    end

end

CLEAN=A(~~A_TO_CLEAN); %% DELETE A VIA LOGICAL INDEXING

toc; %% END TIMER

clearvars -except A B_RANGE CLEAN %% ONLY SHOW RELEVANT VARIABLES
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The trick to making this efficient to to first sort both vectors. Then create a simple loop through one of the vectors, while maintaining an index into the second vector describing the closest element. That is, you will have something like

for ix1 = 1:length(timestamps)
    while (badTimes(ix2) < timestamps(ix1)
        ix2 = ix2+1;
    end
    %check timestamp(ix1) against badTimes(ix2), and maybe badTimes(ix2 + 1) and  badTimes(ix2 - 1)
end

Sorting is relatively efficient, especially using the built-ins. And now you only need a single loop.

This now bears a resemblance portions of the a merge sort algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked extremely well. Many thanks. – user1090581 Sep 13 '12 at 16:19
    
Out of curiosity, what are your before / after processing durations? – Pursuit Sep 13 '12 at 18:52
    
The algorithm in the OP took about 3hr 30mins, and your method took about 2.3 seconds. Quite remarkable. – user1090581 Sep 19 '12 at 6:59

This takes 0.025s for 1e6 'timesteps' on my computer. The method goes linearly through A, updating the index as it steps through the B_RANGE. Special care is needed for 'end of array' cases.

BR=B_RANGE';
C=logical(ones(size(A)));
j=1;
i=1;
tic;
while i<=A_ROWS && j<=B_ROWS

    if A(i)==99
        i=1;
    end
    % find start of bad signal
    while A(i)<BR(1,j) && i<A_ROWS
        i=i+1;
    end
    % finish at the end of A    
    if i==A_ROWS
        break;
    end
    ii=i;
    % find end of bad signal
    while A(ii)<=BR(2,j) && ii<A_ROWS
        ii=ii+1;
    end
    % special case for end of array
    if A(ii)==A(ii-1)
        ii=ii+1;
    end
    % mark bad signal entries
    C(i:ii-1)=false;
    i=ii;
    j=j+1;
end
AM=A(C);
toc
share|improve this answer
    
This answer worked, but Pursuit's explanation was more parsimonious. I wish I could accept multiple answers. – user1090581 Sep 13 '12 at 16:19
    
@user1090581 Heh. They are essentially the same, I guess. You don't have to accept all answers. It's ok with 1, even if it's not mine:) Some people don't bother to do even that.. – angainor Sep 13 '12 at 16:50

This takes 0.3 sec:

%% generate random measured and bad time samples
t       = sort(1e4 * rand(2e6, 1));
t_bad   = sort(1e4 * rand(3e5, 1));

%% find bad indexes
tolerance = 0.01;
idx_bad = ismember(round(t / tolerance), round(t_bad / tolerance));
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this does not exactly discards the values that are further than the tolerance from a bad value. Example: Bad value is 0.4 and tolerance is 1. When you don't care about the exact size of the tolerance it should be fine though. – Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 31 '13 at 15:48

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