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  • We want to use 2 mongo servers in a shard
  • There's only one collection in the database (~110M records).
  • Activity is mostly writing, adding new records, updating old ones
  • Records have only two fields:_id and an array { :_id => 12345, :pp => [ stuff, stuff, ... ] }
  • _id is actually our user id, integer
  • _id is the only index in the collection
  • we want sharding key to be based on: _id%2

i.e _id=1 goes to server 1, _id=2 goes to server 2, _id=3 to server 1, _id=>4 to server 2... and so on

(because _ids are linear, and we want both servers equally balanced on writing)

How do we configure mongos for this?

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1 Answer 1

You can take advantage of tag aware sharding feature added in the 2.2 release of Mongo. http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Tag+Aware+Sharding

The use case feature is meant for (geographically distributed) is very different from your case.

By default (non tag aware option) Mongo efficiently manages the splitting of data across the cluster. Provided a shard key with uniformly distributed values and where queries might have to look at documents with consecutive values the default algorithm that mongo uses is optimal. It will also rebalance to ensure that the data is equally distributed (within a margin that you can configure). It is better not to change it without understanding the implication.

The default algorithm is to break the shard key values into blocks of ranges (chunks) and then distribute the chunks to different members of the shard.

More details at the following pages.

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/core/sharding/

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/core/sharding-internals/#sharding-migration-thresholds

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I would also check out: kchodorow.com/blog/2012/07/25/… –  Jenna Sep 25 '12 at 18:13
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