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I'm curious if their is some python magic I may not know to accomplish a bit of frivolity

given the line:

csvData.append(','.join([line.split(":").strip() for x in L]))

I'm attempting to split a line on :, trim whitespace around it, and join on ,

problem is, since the array is returned from line.split(":"), the

for x in L #<== L doesn't exist!

causes issues since I have no name for the array returned by line.split(":")

So I'm curious if there is a sexy piece of syntax I could use to accomplish this in one shot?

Cheers!

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fixed strip to strip() –  PandemoniumSyndicate Sep 12 '12 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
>>> line = 'a: b :c:d:e  :f:gh   '
>>> ','.join(x.strip() for x in line.split(':'))
'a,b,c,d,e,f,gh'

You can also do this:

>>> line.replace(':',',').replace(' ','')
'a,b,c,d,e,f,gh'
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That second answer, hell yes –  PandemoniumSyndicate Sep 12 '12 at 5:12
    
+1 for replace(). :) –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 12 '12 at 5:17
1  
I actually prefer the first answer, as the second is less robust to what the whitespace is. –  DSM Sep 12 '12 at 15:39

Given an string S:

','.join([x.strip() for x in s.split(':')])
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1  
no need of list comprehension here, just ','.join(x.strip() for x in s.split(':')). –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 12 '12 at 5:00
    
True, although the list comprehension may clarify part of the solution. –  arturhoo Sep 12 '12 at 16:47

Something like?:

>>> L = "1:2:3:4"
>>> result = ",".join([item.strip() for item in L.split(":")])
>>> result
'1,2,3,4'

It takes awhile to get a grasp on list comprehensions. They are basically just packaged loops when you break them down.

So, when learning, try to break it down as a normal loop, and then translate it to a list comprehension.

In your example you don't assign the line variable anywhere, so it would be an error even in a standard loop.

>>> for x in L:
...     items = line.split(":")
...
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
NameError: name 'line' is not defined
>>>
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1  
No need to build a list in the middle –  Burhan Khalid Sep 12 '12 at 4:54
    
Yes, true, but for a beginner it may be confusing as to why that works. –  monkut Sep 12 '12 at 5:02

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