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As we know that each year have the following max day in each month as follows:

Jan - 31 days
Feb - 28 days / 29 days (leap year)
Mar - 31 days
Apr - 30 days
May - 31 days
Jun - 30 days
Jul - 31 days
Aug - 31 days
Sep - 30 days
Oct - 31 days
Nov - 30 days
Dec - 31 days

How to I get bash to return the value (last day of each month) for the current year without using if else or switch or while loop?

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Are you limiting yourself to only bash? –  jedwards Sep 12 '12 at 5:12
    
@jedwards I am open to other bash but must be in unix / linux –  Jack Sep 12 '12 at 5:28
1  
Why the restrictions? Is thia homework? –  Keith Thompson Sep 12 '12 at 6:03
    
@KeithThompson Nope, this is not a homework. I am more interested in optimize speed and using lesser command to accomplish tasks and was wondering if bash can get the last day of a month without telling bash to go through a loop (e.g. if a certain month value, then display this value) or performing hard-coding. –  Jack Sep 12 '12 at 6:58
1  
If speed optimization is your concern, then I suggest saying so rather than imposing specific restrictions. If speed is that important, a C program would probably be a better choice. –  Keith Thompson Sep 12 '12 at 8:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

my take:

for m in {1..12}; do
  date -d "$m/1 + 1 month - 1 day" "+%b - %d days"; 
done
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, only one call to date, beats mine! –  amdn Sep 12 '12 at 13:12
    
@amdn: this may be better code, but without your explanation (below), I'd have no clue what this is doing :-) –  TomRoche Jun 18 '13 at 20:41
    
Tom - this explains it: $ for m in {1..2}; do date -d "$m/1 + 1 month - 1 day" ; done Fri Jan 31 00:00:00 UTC 2014 Fri Feb 28 00:00:00 UTC 2014 $ for m in {1..2}; do date -d "$m/1" ; done Wed Jan 1 00:00:00 UTC 2014 Sat Feb 1 00:00:00 UTC 2014 Should explain it –  Martin Cleaver Aug 8 at 14:39
cat <<EOF
Jan - 31 days
Feb - `date -d "yesterday 3/1" +"%d"` days
Mar - 31 days
Apr - 30 days
May - 31 days
Jun - 30 days
Jul - 31 days
Aug - 31 days
Sep - 30 days
Oct - 31 days
Nov - 30 days
Dec - 31 days
EOF
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I want to upvote you and downvote you at the same time ;) (I settled on the upvote) –  LeonardChallis Sep 3 at 9:12

Assuming you allow "for", then the following in bash

for m in {1..12}; do
    echo $(date -d $m/1/1 +%b) - $(date -d "$(($m%12+1))/1 - 1 days" +%d) days
done

produces this

 Jan - 31 days
 Feb - 29 days
 Mar - 31 days
 Apr - 30 days
 May - 31 days
 Jun - 30 days
 Jul - 31 days
 Aug - 31 days
 Sep - 30 days
 Oct - 31 days
 Nov - 30 days
 Dec - 31 days

Note: I removed the need for cal

For those that enjoy trivia:

Number months from 1 to 12 and look at the binary representation in four
bits {b3,b2,b1,b0}.  A month has 31 days if and only if b3 differs from b0.
All other months have 30 days except for February.

So with the exception of February this works:

for m in {1..12}; do
    echo $(date -d $m/1/1 +%b) - $((30+($m>>3^$m&1))) days
done

Result:

Jan - 31 days
Feb - 30 days (wrong)
Mar - 31 days
Apr - 30 days
May - 31 days
Jun - 30 days
Jul - 31 days
Aug - 31 days
Sep - 30 days
Oct - 31 days
Nov - 30 days
Dec - 31 days
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Strange, it display cal: command not found. –  Jack Sep 12 '12 at 5:28
    
I'm running Linux, "which cal" responds /usr/bin/cal –  amdn Sep 12 '12 at 5:31
    
I know why, cal was not installed in my machine. –  Jack Sep 12 '12 at 5:32
    
I like clyfish's answer! –  amdn Sep 12 '12 at 5:34
    
I modified my answer so it doesn't need cal. Still not as straightforward as clyfish's answer. –  amdn Sep 12 '12 at 6:04

Contents of script.sh:

#!/bin/bash
begin="-$(date +'%-m') + 2"
end="10+$begin"

for ((i=$begin; i<=$end; i++)); do
    echo $(date -d "$i month -$(date +%d) days" | awk '{ printf "%s - %s days", $2, $3 }')
done

Results:

Jan - 31 days
Feb - 29 days
Mar - 31 days
Apr - 30 days
May - 31 days
Jun - 30 days
Jul - 31 days
Aug - 31 days
Sep - 30 days
Oct - 31 days
Nov - 30 days
share|improve this answer
    
you are missing the Dec. –  Jack Sep 14 '12 at 0:45
    
@Jack: Thanks, yes end="10+$begin" should actually be end="11+$begin". Glad you chose Glenn's answer, it is far superior. –  Steve Sep 14 '12 at 0:49

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