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Given the simple code block below, I was wondering if there was a better way to code this in C#

        int lowIndex = 0;
        int highIndex = 1;
        if (end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() == end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres())
        {
            if (end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres())
            {
                lowIndex = 1;
                highIndex = 0;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres())
            {
                lowIndex = 1;
                highIndex = 0;
            }
        }
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2  
Code Review – codesparkle Sep 12 '12 at 5:35
    
why you need to convert to mm to compare values ? seems redundant. Also you yourself stated that this is a simple code block. Is therefore a need to make it more simple? Readability is the king. – Petar Repac Sep 12 '12 at 6:58
    
    
@Peter the conversion to millimetres is required because the primary value is a double, which in conversion equates to the same thing, otherwise I am dealing in tolerances around a non-exact measurement. – sweetfa Sep 12 '12 at 19:56
    
@codesparkle - thanks, wasn't aware of the place – sweetfa Sep 12 '12 at 19:57
up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about something like

int lowIndex = 0; 
int highIndex = 1; 
if ((end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() == end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() && end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres()) ||
    (end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres()))
{ 
    lowIndex = 1; 
    highIndex = 0; 
} 
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I had written the exact same block of code, but you beat me to it by a few minutes. – Scott Lemmon Sep 12 '12 at 5:52

I think what you are trying to do is eliminate having the two lines that set lowIndex and highIndex twice. You can combine the IF statements like this.

int lowIndex = 0;
int highIndex = 1;
if ( (end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() == end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() &&
      end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres()) ||
      end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() )
{
    lowIndex = 1;
    highIndex = 0;
}
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Maybe something like this:

int X0mm = end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres();
int X1mm = end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres();
int Y0mm = end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres();
int Y1mm = end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres();

int lowIndex = (X0mm == X1mm && Y0mm > Y1mm) || (X0mm > X1mm) ? 1 : 0;
int highIndex = lowIndex == 1 ? 0 :1;
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As written the default values of lowIndex and highIndex are never used. You could just define those integers at the bottom instead to make the code a little more compact. – Scott Lemmon Sep 12 '12 at 5:49
    
@ScottLemmon yes you are right. – Reniuz Sep 12 '12 at 6:04
    
@ScottLemmon - take another look... – sweetfa Sep 12 '12 at 20:00

Certainly:

int lowIndex = 0;
int highIndex = 1;
if (   end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() == end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() 
    && end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres() >  end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres()  
    || end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() != end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres()
    && end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() >  end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres())
{
    lowIndex = 1;
    highIndex = 0;
}

end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() != end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() && end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() will always be equivalent to end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() > end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres(), so therefore:

int lowIndex = 0;
int highIndex = 1;
if (   end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() == end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres() 
    && end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres() >  end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres()  
    || end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres() >  end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres())
{
    lowIndex = 1;
    highIndex = 0;
}

Finally, I'm not sure what the result of ConvertToMillimetres is or how complicated it is/ It may make sense if ConvertToMillimetres is time intensive to use some local variables to capture the values of these methods to reduce computation... then again, if not it may not be worth polluting your local scope for a little bit of time saving. Likely, it's a fairly trivial function, so it wouldn't be very advantageous. (end[0] and end1 might work better as local variables, though, as Krishna put it. Or even end1.X and end1.Y, etc. But if you do that, might as well save the results.)

//capture values

var end0Xm = end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres();
var end1Xm = end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres();
var end0Ym = end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres();
var end1Ym = end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres();

//define proper lowIndex, highIndex
int lowIndex = 0;
int highIndex = 1;
if (   end0Xm  == end1Xm 
    && end0Ym  >  end1Ym  
    || end0Xm  >  end1Xm )
{
    lowIndex = 1;
    highIndex = 0;
}

It might be useful to save the result of the test for future use, also, that eliminates a if block, which gives less of a chance for somebody to mess up in the future. However, you still have to do something conditionally. This next code block assumes you know the existence of and understand C#'s ternary operator.

var end0Xm = end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres();
var end1Xm = end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres();
var end0Ym = end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres();
var end1Ym = end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres();

//define proper lowIndex, highIndex
bool testCase = (end0Xm  == end1Xm 
    && end0Ym  >  end1Ym  
    || end0Xm  >  end1Xm);

int lowIndex = testCase? 1 : 0;
int highIndex = testCase? 0 : 1; 

Or maybe you prefer highIndex = !testcase? 1: 0, or even highIndex = 1 - lowIndex.

Etcetera, etcetera.

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I prefer readability over compact code! :) Rename the variables as it best fits your code...

int xComparison = end[0].X.ConvertToMillimetres().CompareTo(end[1].X.ConvertToMillimetres());
int yComparison = end[0].Y.ConvertToMillimetres().CompareTo(end[1].Y.ConvertToMillimetres());

bool isMatch = ((xComparison == 0 && yComparison > 0) || xComparison > 0);

int lowIndex = (isMatch ? 1 : 0);
int highIndex = (isMatch ? 0 : 1);
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Don't think this is C# 4.0 specific, but you could make it more readable:

var endOne = end[0];
var endTwo = end[1];

//now, if you would override the == operator for the type of X and Y to compare using ConvertToMillimetres(), you can have something like:

int lowIndex = (endOne.X == endTwo.X && endOne.Y > endTwo.Y) || (endOne.X > endTwo.X) ? 1 : 0;
int highIndex = lowIndex == 1 ? 0 : 1;
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I would do a method: (code maintainable)

private void GetValueM(List<EndType> end,out int  lowIndex,out int  highIndex)
    {
         lowIndex = 0;
         highIndex = 1;

         if ((end != null) && (end.Count > 2))
         {
             var x0 = end[0].X;
             var x1 = end[1].X;
             var y0 = end[0].Y;
             var y1 = end[1].Y;

             if (x0 != null && x1 != null && y0 != null && y1 != null)
             {
                 if ((x0.ConvertToMillimetres() == x1.ConvertToMillimetres() && y0.ConvertToMillimetres() > y1.ConvertToMillimetres()) ||
                     (x0.ConvertToMillimetres() > x1.ConvertToMillimetres()))
                 {
                     lowIndex = 1;
                     highIndex = 0;
                 }

             }
             else
             {
                 //Any is null  set your value or throw exception
             }
         }


    }
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