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Possible Duplicate:
Short Description of Python Scoping Rules

I wrote two simple functions:

# coding: utf-8
def test():
    var = 1 
    def print_var():
        print var 
    print_var()
    print var 

test()
# 1
# 1
def test1():
    var = 2 
    def print_var():
        print var 
        var = 3 
    print_var()
    print var 

test1()
# raise Exception

In comparison, test1() assigns value after print var, then raise an Exception: UnboundLocalError: local variable 'var' referenced before assignment, I think the moment I call inner print var, var has a value of 2, am I wrong?

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marked as duplicate by esaelPsnoroMoN, sloth, David Robinson, g.d.d.c, Martijn Pieters Sep 12 '12 at 6:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
See this link: stackoverflow.com/questions/423379/… – Hans Then Sep 12 '12 at 6:42
    
@HansThen: No, a global declaration would not help here, as var is a function-scope variable. In python 3 you'd use nonlocal but in python 2 (as used here) there is no way you can do what the OP is trying to do. – Martijn Pieters Sep 12 '12 at 6:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you're incorrect here. Function definition introduces a new scope.

# coding: utf-8
def test():
    var = 1 
    def print_var():
        print var    <--- var is not in local scope, the var from outer scope gets used
    print_var()
    print var 

test()
# 1
# 1
def test1():
    var = 2 
    def print_var():
        print var     <---- var is in local scope, but not defined yet, ouch
        var = 3 
    print_var()
    print var 

test1()
# raise Exception
share|improve this answer
1  
Hang on, I thought python did not look ahead when executing. How does python know that var is going to be a local variable in the second print_var function? – Lauritz V. Thaulow Sep 12 '12 at 6:45
    
because the error is at call time, not at function definition time. if you comment out that troublesome line i have indicated, then i think python would indeed use the var (=2) from the outer scope. – wim Sep 12 '12 at 6:47
    
So when python parses the function it saves a list of the names of all variables that are assigned to within. Then at call time it sees that var is in this list, and complains since it's not defined yet. Is this local variable list accessible? – Lauritz V. Thaulow Sep 12 '12 at 6:53
1  
@lazyr: Exactly; variables are bound to a scope at compile time. Assignment is a storing operation, and binds that variable to the local scope unless marked global. If there is no assignment, the variable is 'free' and looked up in surrounding scopes, but this is bound as well to that specific scope. See Python nested scopes with dynamic features for example. – Martijn Pieters Sep 12 '12 at 6:56
2  
@lazyr: Yes, see docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html, afunction.func_code.co_varnames are local variables. co_freevars and co_cellvars are interesting in this respect; they are variables taken from the surrounding scope (non-global) and variables referred to by nested functions, respectively. – Martijn Pieters Sep 12 '12 at 7:33

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