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int main(){
MyBase *mb;
int choice;

cout << "Select: ";
cin >> choice;

switch (choice) {
    case 1:
        mb = new Test1();
        break;
    case 2:
        mb = new Test2();
        break;
    case 3:
        mb = new Test3();
        break;
    case 4:
        mb = new Test4();
        break;
    case 5:
        mb = new Test5();
        break;
    case 6:{
        LinkTest t;
        t.start();
        break;
    }
    default:
        return 0;
}

if(mb != 0){
    mb->start();
    delete mb;     
}

return 0;
}

If choice is 6, why am I getting a segmentation fault when checking if mb is NULL?

I am new to c++ and just doing some exercises. How can I fix this without affecting the class LinkTest? Thanks.

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Initialize the mb variable: MyBase *mb = 0;. –  DCoder Sep 12 '12 at 7:57
    
Thanks, I thought null assignment is automatic in C++ –  tambalolo Sep 12 '12 at 8:30
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you declare variables inside function scope, they are normally whats called "stack variables". This means they reside in stack-memory which typically contains lots of "garbage" from previous use. Hence, when not initializing the 'mb' variable upon declaration, the initial value is undefined (whatever happened to be lying around on that spot in the stack), typically non-zero. Therefore you should initialize mb upon declaration:

MyBase* mb = 0;

As an aside, I noticed that the 'case 6:' inside the 'switch' doesn't set mb to anything...

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Thanks, I thought it will be automatically assigned with null just like Java. –  tambalolo Sep 12 '12 at 8:26
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You haven't initialized mb; C++ doesn't do that for you; and for the case that choice is 6, mb doesn't get assigned any value, so it is uninitialized later on when you check it against 0, and can hold any random value (that random value could be 0, but in most cases it won't be; it will just contain whatever value there was in the part of memory where the variable now is). Try

MyBase *mb = NULL;
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Thanks, I thought it will be automatically assigned with null just like Java. –  tambalolo Sep 12 '12 at 8:27
1  
In C++, many variables will not be initialized - performancewise, that's a good thing, but it can also introduce much more subtle errors than the one you were seeing. So the rule of thumb is to always initialize all variables! –  RandolphCarter Sep 12 '12 at 8:31
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You need to initialise mb to NULL, otherwise in the case where choice is not in the range 1..5 mb will be undefined. Change:

MyBase *mb;

to:

MyBase *mb = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I thought it will be automatically assigned with null just like Java. –  tambalolo Sep 12 '12 at 8:28
add comment

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